Bruce Robinson

Radio News Director & On Air Host

Bruce Robinson is KRCB-FM News Director and host of Flashback, heard Fridays at 7pm. Bruce can be reached at (707) 584-2012, or email bruce_robinson@krcb.org

Ways to Connect

Mother Jones

Nearly half of the 2 million Wells Fargo bank accounts that were opened without the customers’ knowledge or consent are here in California.  A new, narrowly tailored bill in the state legislature would give those fraud victims some additional leverage to fight back.

State Senator Bill Dodd says his SB 33 was written, in part, to open the way for class action suits by the defrauded customers of Well Fargo Band.

Genetic analysis of varying cannabis strains may aid in the development of narrowly targeted pharmaceutical products. But using the same tool to protect generic strains could help hold prices down.

Phylos Bioscience

Cannabis has been cultivated and used by humankind for centuries. Now the industry’s challenge is understanding and applying that history.

Cannabis arrived in North America from at least two different directions, but how that evolved into the plants that grow here today is not yet clear, says Phylos Biosciences’ Mowgli Holmes.

As his team has collected and analyzed samples from hundreds of cannabis plants and products, Holmes says one unexpected finding has emerged.

Bruce Robinson / KRCB-FM

For years, the aging Village Park campground and trailer park at the eastern edge of Sebastopol was a problem site, subject to flooding, poverty and other issues. Now it is poised to help answer to the city’s homelessness concerns.

As a nod to the changes at the property—which will continue to be owned by city of Sebastopol-- it will be formally renamed Park Village. West County Community Services will become a key presence there, adds Executive director, Tim Miller.

It’s been 17 years since the shallow channel into Bodega Bay was last dredged. So it’s time to do it again, and plans for a project this fall are moving ahead.

The depth of the channel is already compromised at several places along the corridor. Noah Wagner, harbormaster at Spud Point Marin, details those locations.

In California, efforts to boost funding for road repairs are at odds with the concurrent goal of expanding electric vehicle usage. So how can these two needs co-exist?

Sonoma County Ag and Open Space District

A forest of massive coast redwoods and the diverse wildlife they shelter are getting new and permanent protection, funded by distant urban residents who will never see the lands. 

Bordering the Mendocino County line, the Howlett Ranch contains the free-flowing headwaters to a pair of key tributaries to the Gualala River, and still sees spawning runs of coho, steelhead and rainbow trout. And, Bill Keene notes, it connects other large swaths of protected forests.

Sonoma County voters gave strong support last November to a sales tax increase to boost funding for local libraries. As of  May 1, the first benefits from Measure Y will take effect.

To begin preparing for their new budget realities, Library Director Brett Lean consulted with the State Board of Equalization, which monitors the flow of tax revenues. But Lear says it’s difficult right now to look much beyond the new fiscal year that begins in July.

The old Cotati Cabaret had an enthusiastic fan base and a colorful history—one that ended rather abruptly in 1990. But this weekend, for one brief evening, the venue will open its doors once more.

The concert Sunday evening (details here) is a benefit for Live Music Lantern, a three year-old non-profit run by Elijah and Kaya Barntsen. he explains their dual purpose is all about expanding opportunities for people to hear live music.

Sonoma County has been without a local composting operation for a year and a half. And it will be at least twice that long before a new one can get started. But the process is inching forward.

 When commercial composting was introduced in Sonoma County, roughly 20 years ago, by Sonoma Compost, the pioneering local operation was widely studied and imitated, recalls Patrick Carter, Executive Director of the Sonoma County Waste Management Agency.

Santa Rosa-based Climbers For Peace organizes and leads multi-national teams in bond-building ascents of major mountains. Their next trip will take them up the highest peak in the Middle East—assuming the government of Iran allows it.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Riding a bicycle through all 50 states is a good way to get acquainted with America. And talking with folks, in depth, everywhere along the way is an even better way. Today we meet a man who is doing both.

Register, who lives in Houston, Texas when he is not exploring America's back roads, explains why he decided to undertake this multi-year project.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Yet another indication that the cannabis industry is already large and diverse in and around Santa Rosa:  a business-oriented trade shows now underway at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds.

As science increasingly comes under fire from conservative political forces, public support for research and empirical evidence is being rallied in a global array of pro-science events this weekend—including two in Santa Rosa.

In thinking about the importance of science in daily life, Adrienne Alvord, the Western States Director for the Union of Concerned Scientists, points out that is it vital for both economic and personal health.

In agriculture, building, urban design transportation, energy production and use and more, there are steps already being taken to keep carbon out of the atmosphere. And according to a serious new book, scaling up those actions—all of them—could be a pathway to reversing global warming.

Many of the 100 climate change solutions examined by Project Drawdown have interlocking effects. Editor Paul Hawken says their analyses work scrupulously to keep their projected benefits separate.

“Drawdown” is the term used to describe the time when greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have peaked and then begin to decline. A new book offers a pathway to get there by 2050.

The foremost consideration in the assessments made for the Drawdown Project, explains co-founder Paul Hawken, was how much carbon could be kept out of the atmosphere by wider adoption of each strategy.  In most cases, the 30-year impact could be measured in gigatons.

The April 15th deadline for filing 2016 income tax returns applies to all American, including President Trump. It is also serving as an occasion for renewed calls for him to make public his past tax documents.

More information about State Sen. Mike McGuire's SB 149 can be found on his website. Read the full text of the bill here.

Whether its unconscious or overt, racism remains a sensitive issue in America. But the idea of “reverse racism” isn’t an inversion of that—it’s an example. A free public gathering to examine and debunk that idea is happening in Santa Rosa this Wednesday night.

Curing traffic congestion means using fewer vehicles to move a growing number of people. Sonoma County is preparing to test some strategies to do that, as Christian Kallen reports.

The deadline for submitting proposals for the county’s car-sharing pilot program was last Friday. Interviews with the most promising applicants will be held later this month. 

The months from pregnancy through infancy are critical for both mothers and newborns, and can shape the course of the child’s life into adulthood. It can be a critical time for a little constructive guidance, which is provided by a low-profile, but impactful county program.

Newborns don’t arrive with an instruction manual, so first-time parents are usually learning as they go. Supervising Health Nurse Lisa Fredrickson says that’s why the Nurse-Family Partnerships extend through the first 24 months of the child’s life.

An automobile recall repair notice is a warning that something could go wrong with the car unless a part is replaced or fixed. But many of those warnings are going unheeded. So a new Bay Area business is trying to help.

The non-profit arm of Recall Masters is MotorSafey.org, where anyone can check on any pending recalls that might apply to vehicles they own. Find it here.

As the annual Sustainable Enterprise Conference marked its 12th year this week, a recurring thread was the many ways these ideas have taken hold in the wider economy.

Don’t look now, but you’re already aging. So how are you going about it?  A science-based, musical show that is heading for Santa Rosa wants to change how we think about getting older.  Bruce Robinson has a preview.

Dr. Bill Thomas's  Changing Aging Tour will be at the Friedman Center in Santa Rosa on Thursday, April 6. It's a three-part event, and visitors can attend any or all of the segments. Thomas explains how they fit together.

The flaws that were disastrously exposed at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant were enabled by that county’s compliant culture, says an internationally recognized physicist. And he believes that holds a lesson for Americans.

The cultural compliancy of the Japanese people may have contributed to the attitudes that enabled the Fuukushima disaster to happen, but Dr. Ohska  says they are now being further tested by the official statements that have come after the nuclear accident.

How prepared are today's young people to deal with the growing amount of misinformation on the Internet?  In today's North Bay Report we look at legislation to update public school curriculums to teach youngsters survival skills for the digital age. 

While some may be concerned that teaching students about fake news could bring politics into the classroom, the sponsor of SB 135, Senator Bill Dodd, doesn't think the legislature will agree.

Sonoma State Star

For 24 years, Thomas Sargent was an environmental health and safety specialist at Sonoma State. Earlier this month, a Sonoma County civil jury agreed that he'd been harassed and forced to resign under duress in 2015, after complaining about the school's handling of asbestos in Stevenson Hall. But the verdict has not put an end to the concerns, as Steve Mencher reports.

For decades, composting toilets have been an off-the-grid novelty. But in a time of limited fresh water and burgeoning interest in sustainable living, they are ripe for re-examination.

Sonoma County is hardly the only place that composting toilets have been put into use for remote rural residences. But Miriam Volat believes this area may be more receptive than most to the wider use of such fixtures.

Waterless composting of human waste is not a new idea. But in the modern world, it’s never been a popular one either. A new study of the latest models of composting toilets, getting underway here in Sonoma County, hopes to set the stage for changing attitudes toward them.

While the actual study of the efficacy of new composting toilets is just getting started, it required quite some time just to get permission to do it, reports the county’s James Johnson.

fter being announced last year, a project to build a dozen tiny houses for homeless vets is hoping to break ground this summer and test the viability of a novel form of affordable housing. 

Project Manager John “Yohan” Morgan says the initial residents will each be encouraged to put their personal stamp on their small new homes.

Congressional Republicans have long clamored for change in federal health care laws. Now that their actual proposals are moving toward a vote, Health and Finance officials in Sacramento have been able to detail how the replacement plan would affect California. And it’s not a pretty picture.

Pages