Bruce Robinson

Radio News Director & On Air Host

Bruce Robinson is KRCB-FM News Director and host of Flashback, heard Fridays at 7pm. Bruce can be reached at (707) 584-2012, or email bruce_robinson@krcb.org

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Bruce Robinson, KRCB

When local opposition scuttled plans for an atomic energy plant on Bodega head in the early 1960s, the seeds were sown for subsequent no-nukes protests throughout California and beyond. Members of the Abalone Alliance, an early protest group, reunited in the coastal town over the weekend, to review their shared past, and consider their part in shaping a nuclear-free energy future.

Social Advocates for Youth’s new Dream Center in northeast Santa Rosa opened its doors last spring, and saw its available beds for homeless youth filled immediately. Now they are staging an unusual pubic event to call attention to the needs they are working to serve.

Political issues and positions are of secondary interest to comedian Will Durst. He zeros in on their personalities and foibles to, in his words, “put the ‘mock’ in democracy.”

Will Durst’s shows are, for the most part, carefully scripted—albeit with frequent updates. But he relishes the moments of ad lib interaction with the audience.

Will Durst brings his “Elect to Laugh 2016” show to the Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma on Sunday night at 7:30.

CEA

Notwithstanding the earthquake that struck downtown Napa a little more than 2 years ago, our state as a whole has been enjoying an overall lull in significant seismic activity. So the California Earthquake Authority is intensifying its calls for homeowners to take protective steps.

The DIY Earthquake Insurance Premium calculator is on the California Earthquake Authority website here. Watch the video below for additional tips on home earthquake safety.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

For his summer vacation his year, Alan Soule took a trip around the world—literally—behind the wheel of his electric car.

This was a full circuit of the Northern Hemisphere, beginning and ending in Spain. But in between, says Alan Soule, the lone American participant, his passport got a workout.

Along the way, the EV drivers visited many remarkable landmarks and found charging opportunities fairly readily when they were needed. The biggest automotive challenge, says Soule, was the condition of the roads in Kazakhstan.

For a dozen years, volunteers have been working diligently to restore the historic gardens on Alcatraz Island. Now the results of those efforts have been documented in a series of details, full-color drawings by dozens of botanical artists.

The idea for the florilegium arose in 2012, explains Sebastopol artist Nina Antze, when another artist took some visitors to see the historic island prison, which is now a national park site.

It’s been half a century since the Beach Boys were at their peak in the 1960s, yet their music endures and surviving members of the band maintain a busy concert schedule. One of them is founding singer Mike Love, whose new autobiography charts the often rocky history inside the band.

With dozens of books about the Beach Boys already published, why another one? Love says he wanted to offer his own unique perspective.

Our coast is home to dozens of varieties of strange, often elusive, sometimes slimy, yet almost always somehow edible sea life. Kirk Lombard knows where to find them, and what to do with them.

Despite his affinity for "underdog" fish, Lombard reserved one of his longest chapters—a full nine pages—for a popular species he lauds as culturally, economically and recreationally important:  salmon.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Eighty-five years in 400 pages—with plenty of pictures included. That’s what entrepreneur, philanthropist and music lover Don Green has packed into his newly published memoir. 

When Don Green elected to leave his position with the General post Office in London and venture into the business world, many of his then-associates were shocked, he recalls. But it was a pivotal and life-changing decision.

A new, targeted effort to combat violence against women is taking hold in an important, if unexpected context: junior high and high school locker rooms.

CBIM provides the coaches with cue cards that outline 11 discussion topics, including Respect, Personal Responsibility, Insulting Language, Understanding Consent, and Communicating Boundaries.  Verity’s Zach Neely cites another, Bragging about Sexual Reputation as an example of how the program works to change behaviors.

Eight years into the process of creating the proposed southeast Greenway in Santa Rosa, ideas for what it will actually look like are taking shape. An online survey, reviewing three possible alternatives, is underway.

Follow this link to take the Greenway planning survey. Sign up for the Oct. 26 walking tour of the property here.

Thanks in large part to the widespread use of genetically modified corn, soy and other crops, herbicides containing glyphosate are being more widely used than ever before. At the same time, new concerns about the health and environmental damage that the chemical causes are prompting calls to restrict it.

Almost 40 years ago, an unprecedented sit in at the Federal Building in San Francisco helped launch the nationwide disability rights movement.  A special exhibit coming to SRJC details that historic turning point.

The mid-70s were a time when political activism was gaining momentum among people with disabilities, recalls Stan Kosloski, driven in large part by a change in the way they viewed themselves.

The three-stage descent of the full length of the Russian River wrapped up this weekend with a public finale kayaking from Duncan’s Mills to Jenner. It was an extended prelude to a broad examination of the watershed and its future next year. 

By design, the on-the-water descent of the Russian River brought together stakeholders who hold sometimes conflicting views. Riverkeeper Don McEnhill says that shared experience holds the prospect of better working relationships going forward.

LInda Sartot

Santa Rosa resident Linda Sartor has traveled to many international hot spots, speaking out for peace, tolerance and understanding.  On Sunday, she was among the four new honorees added to Sebastopol’s Living Peace Wall.  Today, we revisit a 2012 interview in which she reports back on her then-recent visit to war-ravaged Afghanistan.

Sonoma County Supervisors this week signaled their intention to apply the concept of Extended Producer Responsibility to pharmaceuticals, through a new ordinance to require the safe collection of extra or unwanted medicines.

While industry resistance persists, there is clear public support for the Extended Producer Responsibility approach advanced by county supervisors. The Water Agency's Susan Keach provided some figures for that, too.

This comes as no surprise to the California Product Stewardship Council's Heidi Sanborn.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Efficiency and curiosity are fundamentally at odds with each other, says a Sonoma State liberal studies professor. And that basic conflict needs to be acknowledged in shaping our educational systems.

Curiosity and imagination are separate but closely linked qualities, says Wendy Ostroff. She cites a recent experiment that underscored their importance in problem solving.

Lauren Zelin, World Resources Institute

For years now, Sonoma County agencies and NGOs have been working together to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change. Now that work has been honored and promoted at the national level.

D3Damon/iStockphoto

Questions have arisen around one of the judges hearing a significant current California court case regarding cell phone safety. Suzanne Potter reports.

Libertarianism is a political ideology that has undergone some internal, rather severe, revisions in recent years which have moved it well away from its philosophical origins. A locally produced analytical anthology examines what Libertarianism means today. 

Three of the authors will be on hand to talk about their contributions to Uncivil Liberties, at a special book event in Sonoma Friday evening. For details, click here.

With seven weeks remaining before it is due to open, there is still lots of finish work to be done at the new hotel attached to the tribal casino in Rohnert Park. But a media preview tour this morning showed off a lavish addition to the local scene. 

What do the people of Santa Rosa think about homelessness in their city? A series of facilitated public conversations is about to get started in an effort to gauge public opinion—and ideas.

Each of the planned gatherings (see a partial schedule here) will open with a short informational video about their purpose and intentions. You can preview it below.

  Whether the motivation is political or religious, or just protective parenting, efforts to see certain books suppressed seem as persistent as the seasons. So Banned Books week is here again to remind us of that. 

The American Library Association has released the video below which lists the top ten banned books of the past year. 

Jonathan Bravo, LandPaths

For several years, LandPaths has been offering hikes and other outings for Sonoma County’s Latino residents. This weekend, they took that program a big step further.

Islam vs. Feminism: the False Dichotomy was the topic of a talk given Thursday afternoon at Sonoma State, part of the feminist lecture series there. On her way to the campus, the speaker also visited KRCB to explain her topic and how she came to it.

This issue is hardly limited to Islam, notes Sabina Khan-Ibarra. She also contributed to an anthology that addressed it across multiple faiths.

Although no one will see them all, voters across Sonoma County are being asked to decide 23 separate ballot measures this fall. That’s in addition to the 17 initiatives everyone will see from the state. To find out why so many, KRCB News turned to Sonoma State Political Science professor and ballot measure analyst David McCuan for insights.

In addition to the centralized budgeting that resulted from the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, Professor McCuan observes that it has also led to some significant changes in the make-up of the state legislature—and their actions.

Rhian Miller, KRCB

  Across California, mountaintop fire lookouts are increasingly rare. Spotters can’t penetrate the smog in the southland, and elsewhere, ubiquitous cell phones have diminished the need for them. But in the remote coastal highlands above and east of Jenner, the Pole Mountain Lookout remains active and essential.  Today, reporter Rhian Miller takes us there.

For much of American history, music has demonstrated a consistent power to unify movements and effect change. But is that still true?

  The earliest music of the civil rights movement, recounts David Walls, overlaid new words onto familiar hymns, making those songs easily learned and remembered.

Kat Krause

  Audio ecologist Bernie Krause has been capturing the sounds of the natural world for decades. But the changes he hears in those recordings now carry a clear and worrisome message.

  The Animal Orchestra exhibit at the Parisian Fondation Cartier museum is an immersive experience that occupies the entire facility, marvels Bernie Krause, as he offers a partial description of it.

The entire enterprise has been an unexpected success, Krause says, both for him personally and for the museum.

Holly Hansen

  HALTER, the Horse And Livestock Team Emergency Response project, got started about three years ago, to provide training to fire and rescue workers on how to deal with big animals in difficulty. Already, the Glen Ellen–based organization is making an impact—and getting some major recognition for their efforts.

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