Bruce Robinson

Radio News Director & On Air Host

Bruce Robinson is KRCB-FM News Director and host of Flashback, heard Fridays at 7pm. Bruce can be reached at (707) 584-2012, or email bruce_robinson@krcb.org

Ways to Connect

Students at Santa Rosa Junior College may be headed for a university, training for a career, or simply taking classes for self-improvement. Meeting their disparate needs is just part of the strategic planning process currently underway at the JC. Bruce Robinson takes a closer look. 

  Many SRJC students have had little or no opportunity for foreign travel or exposures, notes college President Frank Chong. So part of the school’s planning involves recruiting students from abroad, to bring more international interactions to the local educational experience.

Say goodbye to cheap oil, high-wage manufacturing jobs, and rampant consumerism, says energy analyst Richard Heinberg. The coming new economy will get along just fine without depending on them.

As the era of inexpensive fossil fuels wanes, so too will big agribusiness go into decline, Heinberg predicts. But already he sees a resurgence of family farming rising to take over the critical role of providing sustenance for local communities.

The preliminary results of the 2013 count of homeless people in Sonoma County will be presented to the board of Supervisors this morning. And, as Bruce Robinson reports, the news is mostly grim. 

Peter Connery of Applied Survey Research, which conducts similar studies for other counties and cities in California and beyond, says that despite the worrisome figures in his 2013 for Sonoma County, the programs in place here have helped prevent matters from becoming even worse.

Rescuing the Rio

May 2, 2013

  As only movie house for miles around, the Rio Theater has a devoted customer base. But they were only the starting point for the on-line fund-raising effort that succeeded this week in keeping the pictures moving at the Monte Rio meeting place.

Climate change and rising fossil fuel costs affect everyone, so how can we best prepare to minimize their impacts? Transition Santa Rosa is out to find their city’s answers to that question.

College of Marin

California is home to some of the biggest trees on the planet. Now new cloning efforts may allow them to take root in many other parts of the world—sequestering tons of carbon as they grow.

The Archangel Ancient Tree Archive is a small, Michigan-based non-profit dedicated to preserving the genetics of ancient trees, propagating them, and using those cloned saplings for reforestation around the world. Founder David Milarch explains their work in this video.

: Courtesy Anne T. Kent California Room, Marin County Free Library

  Along with Sonoma State University, and the Cities of Cotati and Rohnert Park, the Marin Civic Center is also celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Bruce Robinson reviews the creation of the iconic county complex.

  At a public meeting at San Rafael High School on July 31, 1957, Wright offered this concept of what a "civic center" for the community might be.

 

Sonoma County presents a prosperous and inclusive face to the world, but upon closer examination, this area is also home to serious and growing income inequality. A new report spells it out in detail, and Bruce Robinson has this preview.

Ginny Browne, author of The State of Working Sonoma in 2013 report, says that in summary, it shows that the “hourglass economy” is expanding in Sonoma County.

  A new interactive map, made public today by the California Environmental Protection Agency, enables viewers to identify the zip codes most impacted by localized sources of air and water pollution. “Cal Enviroscreen” compiles toxic clean-up sites, traffic emissions, areas of where pesticide use is high and hazardous waste generators. That information is then displayed on maps, which also show in greater detail what types of pollutants are found in each area.

Egrets and Herons

Apr 22, 2013
Gordon Sherman, courtesy of Audubon Canyon Ranch

Egrets and herons were nearly driven to extinction by fashionable hatmakers more than a century ago. Today they are a popular symbol of wildlife conservation. Bruce Robinson talks with a scientist who studies them.

   Isolation can be one of the biggest problems faced by aging senior citizens. A group in Petaluma is exploring a new, cooperative model to foster greater inter-reliance for this population.

The Petaluma Village Exploration Project will host an open meeting on Tuesday evening, April 23, at 7 pm in the Methodist Church at 410 D Street in Petaluma. They also hold regular noon meetings at the PEP Housing offices at 951 Petaluma Blvd. South. Additional information is available through the group’s blog.

Joe Martinez / United Farm Workers

  Along with the horrific Boston bombing, this week’s news also contained some hopeful prospects for advocates of national immigration reform. KRCB’s Bruce Robinson spoke with some of them.

A more detailed analysis of the policies contained in the Senate immigration reform measure can be read here. Support for  the bill will also be a major theme at the annual May Day March and Rally in Santa Rosa on May 1. Details below.

Many developmentally disabled youth don’t fit in at conventional colleges. So a west county man is leading a drive to create a new school that’s designed to fit them. Bruce Robinson spoke with him.

A community orientation meeting to introduce the Mulberry Village concept will be held on Saturday morning, April 20, from 10:30 to noon at the Sebastopol Community Center Annex on Morris Street.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Social Advocates for Youth currently operates an emergency shelter for young teens and a transitional home for youth who have aged out of foster care. Soon, they hope to expand their services to meet more of the needs of Sonoma County’s growing number of homeless young people. Bruce Robinson has details.

Hole in the Media Productions

Project Censored publishes a book each year, produces a weekly radio show, maintains an active website, has created several video projects, and is regularly featured in newspaper and magazine articles. Now it’s the subject of a documentary film as well. Bruce Robinson offers a preview.

Project Censored:  The Movie is being shown twice this week at the Sonoma International Film Festival, including a featured Friday evening screening at the Sebastiani Theater.

KRCB photo by Danielle Venton

Big changes are underway at the venerable Hotel Petaluma, as a new owner implements upgrades. But evicted tenants and others contend that the former occupants have gotten a raw deal in the process. Bruce Robinson reports.

The Covers Story

Apr 9, 2013

A 12-inch square offers artists a flexible frame for all kinds of artistry, so it’s little wonder that many record album covers have become such memorable images. A new documentary examines the stories behind some of those covers, and KRCB’s Bruce Robinson talked with the film-maker.

The Cover Story is being shown twice this week at the Sonoma International Film Festival, at 10:30 am on Thursday, April 11 (at Murphy's Pub) and at 9 pm on Saturday, April 13 (at the Vintage House). 

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Every second counts in an emergency, so a new cell phone app has been designed to expedite alerts to both emergency responders, and the people who most care about you. Bruce Robinson has details.

Initially created for personal use, variations on Guardian on the Go are now being developed for other applications, including retailers, explains Protego co-founder Ray Kryzek.

Understanding Weeds

Apr 5, 2013
U.C. Davis

  Native plants that grow where we don’t want them are one sort of weed problem. Escaped exotics from other climates can be quite another. The University of California’s leading weed expert discusses both sorts with KRCB’s Bruce Robinson.

You can find links to a weed identification database here, and tips on home weed control techniques in the video below.

The biggest thing standing between the small Wappo tribe of North Bay Indians and their goal of regaining official recognition from the federal government could be a potential casino they’re not sure they would ever build.

Food, faith, and sustainability go hand in hand with the support and encouragement of a new initiative that is taking root in Sonoma County.

Although he is coordinating the local effort, Steve Schwartz points out that it is modeled on some like-minded national initiatives.

  Respondents to an online survey regarding the condition of Sonoma County’s roads, and possible ways to fund improvements confirmed the scope of the problem, but offered mixed reactions to a series of suggestions for funding improvements.A total of 624 anonymous Sonoma county residents responded to the survey, posted by Save Our Sonoma Roads.Sonoma County supervisors have been evaluating several taxes and other measures to expand the number of roads to be maintained in good condition.

historicalseaport.org

They’re back! Following a wildly successful debut visit last spring, a pair of tall-masted wooden sailing ships will return this afternoon to Bodega Bay, one year to the day after their local debut.

  Ticket information, reservations and a schedule of activities are all available from the Tall Ships website. The two vessels will visit Bodega Bay April 2-8, before sailing on to Eureka.

Jobs Made Real

Mar 29, 2013

YouTube videos offer far more than casual entertainment. Corralled and curated on a new, locally developed website, they can also help teens explore career options they might never have otherwise considered.

Although the Jobs Made Real website was designed with teens in mind, Chops Teen Club Executive Director Diana Curtin says she got an unexpected demonstration of its wider demographic appeal…in her own home.

 Business incubation is about creating jobs, not just getting start-ups launched. So the North Bay iHub (Innovation Hub) is retooling itself with a redefined focus. Bruce Robinson gets the inside story from a couple of the key players.

Click the link to see the updated and redesigned website for the North Bay iHub.

Snow Leopard Conservancy

Snow Leopards are found only in the high, wild mountains of central Asia, where harsh climate just one of the dangers they face. But the rare cats also have an ally, in Sonoma zoologist Dr. Rodney Jackson. Bruce Robinson talks with him.

Dr. Rodney Jackson will talk about snow leopards in a presentation at the Sonoma Veterans Hall tonight at 7 pm. The program is hosted by Sonoma Birding.

 Strong leadership in the development of renewable bio-fuels is coming from an unexpected branch of American government—the US Navy.

From sails to oil to steam to nuclear power, the US Navy has a history of adapting quickly to changes in energy systems. It’s something they are continuing today, in response to both climate change, and rising fuel oil costs. And not just at sea.

Kelly-Yamamoto films

The thousands of acres of open space and shoreline now protected and accessible to the public might not be there but for the efforts of a handful of visionary conservationists just few generations ago. A new documentary by a couple of North Bay film-makers  tells their story. Bruce Robinson has theirs.

See below for upcoming screening dates, and a map showing the footprint of the proposed Marincello development.

It cleans water, sequesters carbon underground, and boosts agricultural production. Yet the material known as biochar is just beginning to be appreciated and used in the 21st century. Bruce Robinson chats with an advocate.

More information  about the Sonoma Biochar Initiatve, including how to join, can be found here.

Peter Hirst of New England Biochar explains how the stuff is made in this video.

SOS Roads

All across California, the projected costs for maintaining local streets and roads far outstrips the funds available for that purpose. In the first of a two-part report, KRCB’s Bruce Robinson examines the size of the problem in Sonoma County.

  

  No one disputes the need for huge expenditures to preserve and maintain public streets and roads in our communities. But not one seems to have a clear idea of where that money will come from, either.

As bad as the cost estimates are now, they could get worse in a hurry, warns Santa Rosa Public Works Director Rick Moshier.

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