Danielle Venton

News Reporter/Producer

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At Sausalito's Marine Mammal Center, staff and volunteers have cared for historic numbers of rescued animals, as ocean conditions remain out of whack. KRCB reporter Danielle Venton visited the center to learn more. 

What should you do if you come across a stranded marine mammal? Shawn Johnson, director of veterinary science at the Marine Mammal Center has some advice. 

Is it possible for Alzheimer’s disease to be reversed? That's the tantalizing suggestion of current scientific studies being done at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato.

Alzheimer’s disease is the major cause of cognitive decline as we age. Local researchers are making strides in preventing and treating this disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. Today we start a 2-part series highlighting Alzheimer’s research done at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato.

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Medical professionals are increasingly using games in their efforts to make people healthier. Is the trend here to stay?

The games take many forms and are designed to address a host of conditions: from asthma to diabetes, depression or stroke. In fact, your doctor may soon be suggesting health games as a way to improve your well being.

Courtesy Flickr user Patrick Dirden

The storm that blew through the North Bay – toppling trees and downing powerlines – is just a preview, forecasters say, of the heavy storms we can expect this winter due to El Niño. The weather condition is on a lot of people’s mind these days. While it's forecast to bring much needed water, it is also expected to be one of the strongest on record. That could mean flooding, loss of power and landslides. KRCB wondered what the North Bay is doing to prepare. 

Danielle Venton/KRCB

California is dependent on a certain type of storm, known as an "atmospheric river," for as much as half of it's annual rainfall. Unfortunately, scientists still don't know a lot about these strong, wet storms sometimes referred to as the hurricanes of the Pacific. On today's North Bay Report, we follow a research flight on a quest to unpick the secrets of these storms from the inside. It's all part of an ambitious experiment known as CalWater 2015

Danielle Venton/KRCB

California is dependent on a certain type of storm, known as an "atmospheric river," for as much as half of it's annual rainfall. Unfortunately, scientists still don't know a lot about these strong, wet storms sometimes referred to as the hurricanes of the Pacific. On today's North Bay Report, we follow a research flight on a quest to unpick the secrets of these storms from the inside. It's all part of an ambitious experiment known as CalWater 2015

KRCB

Marin General Hospital successfully lowered its caesarian section rates by employing nurse midwives. As KRCB’s Danielle Venton reports, duplicating those results around the state is going to require some creative thinking. 

A soon-to-launch state-wide effort from the California HealthCare Foundation is aimed at changing hospital practices around giving birth, may provide some of those answers. 

KRCB

From squid dissections to liquid nitrogen ice cream: The Bay Area Science Festival teaches kids that science is in everything. KRCB was on the scene to catch the fun.

To attend upcoming BASF events, visit their website

KRCB

In this first of a two part series, KRCB examines what’s behind the long-term rise in cesarean sections and what can be done to reduce them.

In 2011 Marin General Hospital decided to overhaul their staffing practices. Privately insured pregnant mothers would now receive the same staffing care as publicly insured mothers: Around-the-clock nurse midwives and "laborists" -- obstetricians focused solely on delivering babies rather than maintaining a clinical practice. 

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