Fresh Air

Weekdays 4:00 pm & Repeats Monday-Thursday12:00 AM
  • Hosted by Terry Gross

Fresh Air opens the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics. 

Photo Credit: Dan Burke

  

Terry Gross hosts this multi-award-winning daily interview and features program. The veteran public radio interviewer is known for her extraordinary ability to engage guests of all dispositions. Every weekday she delights intelligent and curious listeners with revelations on contemporary societal concerns.

Listen to recent stories, or whole programs here on the Fresh Air NPR page:

www.npr.org/programs/fresh-air

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

On July 20, 1969, an estimated 530 million people watched on live television as Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong became the first human to step upon the surface of the moon. Nearly 50 years later, Academy Award-winning director Damien Chazelle revisits Armstrong's "giant leap for mankind" — but with a more intimate lens. First Man, starring Ryan Gosling, focuses on the personal sacrifices behind Armstrong's monumental step.

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Everyone is familiar with the official film genres, like the Western or the romantic comedy. But most of us divide movies into less intellectual categories.

There are movies that everybody has to see, like A Star is Born. There are movies you couldn't pay me to see; in my case, that's anything with the word "Saw" in its title. And then there are movies we know we ought to see but dread having to go.

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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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Last week, Facebook announced the most serious security breach in its history, in which unknown hackers were able to log onto the accounts of nearly 50 million Facebook users.

Serious data breaches and the Russian disinformation campaign in 2016 have put Facebook and its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, under scrutiny as the mid-term elections approach. Dave talks with New Yorker staff writer Evan Osnos about how Facebook became vulnerable to spreading disinformation. Join us.

Sarah Smarsh is a daughter of the white working class. Born in rural Kansas, Smarsh traces her lineage back through five generations of family farmers. She also traces herself back through generations of teenage pregnancies; Smarsh's mother was just 17 when she had her.

Writer and director Tamara Jenkins was in her early 40s and struggling with infertility when she and her husband began what she calls a "by any means necessary" campaign to have a child.

It was an emotionally draining time. They looked into international adoption and also began in vitro fertilization treatment. A friend in whom Jenkins confided encouraged her to write about her experiences, but Jenkins demurred.

"I was horrified and just repulsed," she says. "I would never write about this stuff."

Filmmaker Tamara Jenkins. She’ll talk about her new film “Private Life.” It’s about a couple, in their 40’s, trying to have a baby through any means necessary:  fertility drugs, in vitro fertilization, egg donor and adoption.  The film stars Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giametti.  The film opens in theaters and starts streaming on Netflix on Friday October 5th. Jenkins also wrote and directed the comedy The Slums of Beverly Hills and the film The Savages.

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Michael Lewis is the author of bestselling books The Big Short and Moneyball. He talks with Terry about his new book, The Fifth Risk. It looks at the federal government under President Trump, by focusing on Trump’s departments of energy, agriculture and commerce, and how unprepared they are now to deal with urgent risks.

These are highly charged times for politics reporters. Just ask Greg Miller, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist who has broken a number of stories related to the Trump administration's ties to Russia.

Miller says that he's been "trolled a lot" because of his work. But after revealing that then-national security adviser Michael Flynn had discussed U.S. sanctions with Russian officials prior to Trump's inauguration, Miller experienced something new: notes from grateful readers.

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On the next Fresh Air –the challenges of investigating Russian interference in the election and connections between the Trump campaign and Russia.  Terry talks with Washington Post reporter Greg Miller, who broke several related stories, and shared a Pulitzer prize this year.  Now he has a book called The Apprentice:  Trump, Russia, and the Subversion of American Democracy.  Join us.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'In The Moment, You Just Fly': Jon Batiste Lets Loose At The Piano: Batiste, the band leader for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, sits at the piano and demonstrates his "everything in the pot" style of playing.

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Robert Redford has announced that he’s retiring from acting and that his role in the new film The Old Man and the Gun, will be his last.  We’ll listen back to Terry’s 2013 interview with him, about his early career in Hollywood, and the movies that made him a star.  Join us.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Is democracy dying? That's the subject of the October issue of the Atlantic magazine that includes an article by Washington Post columnist Anne Applebaum. Terry talks with her about the move toward authoritarianism, conspiracy theories, and attacks on the free press in Poland, where she lives much of the time, and in other parts of Europe, and the similarities she’s starting to see in the U.S. Join us.

Music came naturally to Jon Batiste, the leader of Stay Human, the house band for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Growing up outside of New Orleans as part of a large musical family, he says, "I picked up on all of these things that are integral to who I am as a musician without necessarily studying them."

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