Morning Edition

Weekdays 6 AM - 9 AM

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep
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The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Morning News Brief

Sep 11, 2018

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We know that forecasters, they do the best they can. But it is an imprecise science. Their predictions may turn out differently. Having said that, the latest forecast for Hurricane Florence is pretty bad.

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Paris came up with a new answer to an old problem. Parisians rank this particular problem as one of the city's worst, although many do not like the mayor's solution. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley investigates.

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In Venezuela, social media can be a life line to the outside world.  It might also put you – or your family - in danger.  Government censorship of news media has been an ongoing issue, and many are now concerned that social media censorship is next. How the crisis in Venezuela is affecting social media.

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A white Dallas police officer was arrested last night for fatally shooting a black man in his own apartment. She was arrested on manslaughter charges and later released on bond. Christopher Connelly from our member station KERA reports.

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Review: Showtime's 'Kidding' Starring Jim Carrey

Sep 10, 2018

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The character Jim Carrey plays on his new TV show just might remind you of someone else you've seen on television over the years. This is how he's described in the first episode when he visits Conan O'Brien's late-night talk show.

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More Americans say they're enthusiastic about voting in a midterm election than at any point in the last two decades. But what about those who likely won't vote this November?  While there are barriers to voting, millions of Americans who *could* vote choose not to.  We'll examine why.

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When the Trump administration decided to pay subsidies to farmers hurt by trade, it reminded NPR's Planet Money podcast team about the time another president tried to help farmers. Kenny Malone has the epic tale of government cheese.

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The confirmation hearings on Capitol Hill have been contentious. Now Senators must decide Brett Kavanaugh's fate.  Did Democrats press hard enough on issues like abortion, gun violence and labor rights?  Or is Kavanaugh's path clear to a party-line confirmation to the Supreme Court?

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During the first Mass of the school year, two students at St. Bernard Elementary School in suburban Pittsburgh stand in front of the congregation and lead their classmates in prayer.

They pray for the leaders of the world, for the sick and suffering, and for the victims of abuse in the Catholic Church.

It is the only time clergy abuse is mentioned during the service. It might be the only time it's mentioned in the school. Principal Anthony Merante says he wants to leave that conversation up to parents.

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Former Trump Staffer On 'NYT' Op-Ed

Sep 6, 2018

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Facebook Use Changing Among Young Users

Sep 6, 2018

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Former Colleague On Kavanaugh Day 2

Sep 6, 2018

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So what did we learn from some of those questions and answers? Let's dig a little deeper with Kimberly Wehle. She's a former assistant U.S. attorney, served on the Whitewater investigation with Judge Kavanaugh. Welcome to the program.

KIMBERLY WEHLE: Good morning.

Scientists have discovered bacteria that attack and kill germs. Now they're trying to harness them to treat infections and protect us from disease. It's also a line of research that could be put to use in the event of a germ-warfare attack.  Plus, the latest on the Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court confirmation hearings.

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