Morning Edition

Weekdays 6 AM - 9 AM

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep
Credit Steve Barrett

The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. 

Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

http://www.npr.org/programs/morning-edition

Scandal Shines Light On Tampa Social Scene

Nov 15, 2012

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Hostess Brands Threatens To Liquidate

Nov 15, 2012

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NPR's business news begins with Twinkie trouble.

Studies Examine Effect Of Tax Increase On Wealthy

Nov 15, 2012

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Obama's Visit To Myanmar: Too Much, Too Soon?

Nov 15, 2012

When President Obama sets off to Asia this weekend to highlight his so-called pivot to the region, he will make a bit of history: Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar.

The country, also known as Burma, was a pariah state for decades, ruled by a ruthless military dictatorship. That is changing, and the Obama administration has encouraged a dramatic reform process in the country. But it may be too early for a victory lap.

Why Coke Cost A Nickel For 70 Years

Nov 15, 2012

Prices change; that's fundamental to how economies work.

And yet: In 1886, a bottle of Coke cost a nickel. It was also a nickel in 1900, 1915 and 1930. In fact, 70 years after the first Coke was sold, you could still buy a bottle for a nickel.

Three wars, the Great Depression, hundreds of competitors — none of it made any difference for the price of Coke. Why not?

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Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. A driver delivering takeout for a Chinese restaurant left his car running while he ran in an order. He comes back and guess what? No car. He called his boss, who called the next customer on the route to apologize. But they had their takeout. The car thief-turned delivery man made a few extra bucks. But at the next house on his route the cops were waiting. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Scandals Remind Us Generals Are Not Infallible

Nov 14, 2012

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It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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The word nonprofit evokes the image of a charity or a church, an educational institution, public radio station. But David Evans of Bloomberg Markets Magazine took a closer look at the world of nonprofits and discovered something that he considered suspicious. Even though many nonprofits make millions and millions in profits, they pay no taxes.

Sandy Deals Powerful Blow To Housing In New Jersey

Nov 14, 2012

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

More than two weeks after Sandy hit the Northeast, thousands of people in New Jersey are still unable to return to their homes. And as NPR's Laura Sydell reports, finding temporary housing has proven to be a confusing and difficult process for many storm victims.

Congress' Lame Duck Session Could Be Memorable

Nov 14, 2012

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Congress is beginning a busy post-election session. Lawmakers have weeks to prevent higher taxes and spending cuts due to take effect at the end of the year. Then there are hearings on the deaths of four Americans in Benghazi, Libya and the scandal over the affair that ended the career of CIA Chief David Petraeus. Here's NPR's David Welna.

Study: Reading 'Maxim' Can Make You A Theft Target

Nov 14, 2012

Some time ago, a man wearing jeans, cowboy boots and a hoodie drove a dirty Ford Explorer into a carwash in Fort Worth, Texas. As soon as the car came back clean, he got it filthy again, and drove to the next carwash. He did this with every single full-service carwash in town.

The man wasn't suffering from a strange mental disorder; Patrick Kinkade was a criminologist conducting an experiment.

A 'Green' Gold Rush? Calif. Firm Turns Trash To Gas

Nov 14, 2012

Second of a two-part series. Read Part 1

California starts the ball rolling Wednesday on a controversial scheme to keep the planet from overheating. Businesses will have to get a permit if they emit greenhouse gases.

Some permits will be auctioned today; the rest are free. The big idea here is the state is putting a ceiling on emissions.

It's a gamble. And for this top-down climate plan to work, it has to usher in a greener, more efficient economy.

A&M Records: Independent, With Major Appeal

Nov 14, 2012

Dear Sports Czars: Take Your Ball And Go Home

Nov 13, 2012

Czars.

It was fun to call American sports commissioners czars, but once players started to have unions, a commissioner really became more like a majority leader in a legislature, trying to keep his party — the owners — together in their financial battles against the minority opposition, the athletes.

Dictionary Chooses American Word Of 2012

Nov 13, 2012

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Homeless Man Jailed For Charging Cell Phone

Nov 13, 2012

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Azerbaijan Leader's Statue In Mexico Draws Protests

Nov 13, 2012

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Greece Gets More Time To Dig Out Of Deficit

Nov 13, 2012

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NPR's business news starts with a small reprieve for Greece.

Missouri, Kansas Reject Health Exchanges

Nov 13, 2012

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Toothbutter: noun. Butter spread so thickly as to reveal teeth marks upon biting.

The fact that this word exists in the Danish language should help to explain what politicians were up against when they introduced the "fat tax" just over a year ago. This is a country that loves it some butter (and meat, and all things dreadful to the arteries).

Obama Hopes For Another Victory: Avoiding Fiscal Cliff

Nov 13, 2012

President Obama meets with labor leaders at the White House on Tuesday to discuss how to steer clear of the so-called fiscal cliff. It's the first of many meetings aimed at avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts at the beginning of the new year.

A week ago, the president proved again that he and his team are good at winning elections. The question now is whether he can translate victory at the ballot box to success in shaping policy.

The Virgin Mary is one of the most familiar icons of Christianity. For centuries, artists have depicted her on everything from backyard statues of a rosy-cheeked innocent to paintings of magnificent Madonnas hanging in museums all over the world. But few writers have taken up her story or tried to create their own version of the events of her life.

Now, Irish writer Colm Toibin does just that. His novella, The Testament of Mary, raises questions about the life of Jesus' mother and the stories that laid the groundwork for the creation of a church.

The FBI's Role In The Petraeus Investigation

Nov 13, 2012

In Washington scandals, the question is usually what the White House knew.

But in the case of former CIA Director David Petraeus, lawmakers are asking why President Obama did not know about a federal investigation that had found evidence Petraeus was having an affair.

BBC Engulfed In Second Crisis Within Weeks

Nov 12, 2012

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Let's look now at the impact of some shocking revelations on the other side of the Atlantic. Britain's media has had a pretty rough year. First, the phone-hacking scandal that led to the closure of Rupert Murdoch's popular tabloid News of the World. Now the esteemed BBC is in trouble. Over the weekend, the head of the BBC resigned, plunging the world's largest public broadcaster into its second crisis within weeks. NPR's Philip Reeves has more.

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Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne, with news from the world of Oz.

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JUDY GARLAND: (As Dorothy) There's no place like home.

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

With the election settled, Washington, Wall Street and much of the rest world, it seems, are focused on whether Congress and a reelected president can avoid the fiscal cliff. To tell us what's at stake, we turn now to David Wessel. He's the economics editor of The Wall Street Journal and author of "Red Ink," a new primer on the federal budget and the deficit.

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