activism

Bruce Robinsoon, KRCB

  Sonoma County Supervisors have unanimously backed a $15 per “Living Wage” for workers paid directly or indirectly by the county. But it’s going take a year or more to be fully implemented.

Caravana 43

The 43 Mexican college students who disappeared last fall during a police assault on their demonstration in remembrance of a 1968 student massacre, have been declared dead by government officials, but their families dispute that. They’re now touring the United States to publicize the unresolved disappearance, and a group of them visited Sonoma County Tuesday.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

 

  American involvement in Viet Nam was gearing up 50 years ago, and programs to recall that history are likewise increasing now. At Sonoma State yesterday, that included a series of “teach-ins” that reviewed some of the opposition to that war—and the others that have followed it.

  It was a matter of conscience for many young men to submit to the draft while also opposing it, recalls activist Lee Swenson. These non-violent actions, taken voluntarily by draftees who could have used other resources to avoid conscription, gave moral weight to their stance.

  Santa Rosa has changed a lot since 1965, but the districts for the city’s SRJC trustees have not. A coalition of activists want to update those lines to make the areas more representative.

  Redistricting advocates are suggesting that the 3-4-5 district be divided into three smaller districts, but Robert Edmonds says it might be useful or necessary to expand the process to include the entire county.

 

  Public libraries everywhere are reflecting social and technical changes around them. So how can Sonoma County’s library’s plan for their future?

Adjunct Professors Stage 1-Day Walkout

Feb 25, 2015
Photo courtesy of San Jose State University

  Rallies are being held today on college campuses in San Diego, Los Angeles and the Bay Area to push for hiring more full-time, permanent faculty. Lori Abbott of California News Service explains why.

 Thousands of people from all over California are preparing to converge in Oakland Saturday to show their support for more aggressive measures to combat global warming. And Sonoma County will be well represented among them.

    For Denny Rosatti, Executive Director of Sonoma County Conservation Action , the biggest worry--among many--about fracking is it's potential impact on California's groundwater reserves.

From apartheid in South Africa to tobacco in the United States, corporate divestment campaigns have successfully pushed for social change. Now that approach is being tried to combat climate change, with health care organizations as a target.

Dr. Ring has developed an extensive informational wesbite on climate change and health issues.  The divestiture petition drive is hosted separately.

Carolynn Box, Five Gyres

Carolynn Box is a Sonoma County native and 1996 Analy High School grad who has spent much of the past four years at sea, trawling the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans for plastic particles with the activist non-profit, Five Gyres. And finding them virtually everywhere.

 It has been suggested that specially outfitted ships could scoop up plastic particles from the gyres and recycle them. But having seen the scale of the problem first-hand, Carolynn Box is skeptical.

Community Organizing

Dec 17, 2014

Begun just 80-odd years ago, Community Organizing has changed with the times, as Sebastopol sociology professor emeritus David Walls documents in his new book on the subject.    

   With its broad perspective, Walls’ Community Organizing is able to speak to a diverse audience.  But as the author explains, that wasn’t exactly the original plan for either him or the publisher.

  To cut down on student suspensions and expulsions, two Santa Rosa schools have introduced restorative justice programs as an alternative. Today,  the second half of our two-part report explores how that diversionary program works.

While the Santa Rosa City Schools administration is moving to expand the Restorative Justice program to additional campuses, students at Santa Rosa High have already embraced the concept, creating both a Facebook page and the video below to promote it.

Sonoma County Museum

  Today it looks like a placid pond, but 50 years ago the deep hole at the base of Bodega Head was the focus of a battle that helped galvanize modern environmentalism.

  The crucial moment in the fight against the nuclear facility came when noted seismologist, Pierre St. Amand  was able to visit the site and report back to the US Department of the Interior. Doris Sloan clearly remembers the day she escorted St. Amand to that pivotal visit.

 

 Virtually everyone is in some form of denial around climate change, contends progressive journalist Naomi Klein, but their reasons for that can be radically different.

While capitalist exploitation of fossil fuels has triggered and accelerated the climate change crisis, Klein says there are other solid reasons to create an alternative economic system.

  The issue of Climate Change is a big concern for many area high school students, and a large group of them are coming together this evening to talk about what they are doing and share ideas. It’s being organized by the Eco-2-School program, and today KRCB’s Bruce Robinson talks with the woman who runs it.

The Green Teen gathering is in the Montgomery High School cafeteria from 5-8 pm today. Find out more about the Eco-2-School program here.

  When a crowd of artists and advocates for peace, sustainability and justice marches through downtown Santa Rosa on Saturday, they will not be alone. The local action is part of a worldwide day of similar events, all instigated by a group with Sonoma County roots—100 Thousand Poets for Change.

(c) Robert Shetterly/Americans Who Tell The Truth

A veteran CIA analyst says political agendas have corrupted his old office, driving whistle blowers like Edward Snowden to act outside of official channels in order to deliver truth to the public. 

  As a private citizen, Ray McGovern says he is still able to keep up on international and domestic events in much the same way he did while working at the CIA.

The rapid rise to prominence of the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) has, in some quarters, been called a failure of US intelligence gathering.  McGovern doesn’t see it that way.

  The public rationale for Congressional authorization of America’s entry into the Viet Nam War has since been discredited as misleading or worse. But a local serviceman who was in the Gulf of Tonkin in 1964 says that even then, he saw classified documents that belied the official account.

While the motives surrounding the Aug.2, 1964 “incident” involving the two American destroyers in the Tonkin Gulf may never be fully known, there is no dispute that some sort of exchange took place. But as Fred Ptucha explains, the same cannot be said of what happened two days later.

What determines whether or not a public protest will remain peaceful or veer into violent confrontations? A new study underway at UC Berkeley suggests that police actions often make the difference.

  When the call for a blood drive goes out, there is one sizable group of willing donors who are routinely excluded. Gay men are prohibited from giving blood, due to a decades-old ban that is now being questioned. Today is the second National Gay Blood Drive, here in Sonoma County and across the nation, organized to press for a change in that prohibition. Here’s more about it.

  The US Justice Department is being asked to investigate the more than five dozen officer-involved fatalities in Sonoma County since 2000. That was the year an earlier US Commission on Civil Rights submitted its report on the 18 similar deaths in the previous decade.

    For attorney Isaak Schwaiger, a former Sonoma County prosecutor as well as a Marine who served in Iraq, a crucial pivot point in modern policing is the primacy now given to “officer safety.”

Greg King, a one-time Sonoma County journalist, has spent the past three decades working to protect and preserve the remaining old growth redwood forests of Northern California. His book detailing that history—both his and the trees’—is a work in progress, but he’s offering a preview in a talk on the Sonoma Coast this evening. Here, we get a preview of that preview.

  The power of social media and the Internet can be a remarkable thing. One current example is a local woman—someone well-known to KRCB listeners—who has used the web to mobilize bird lovers nationally and world-wide, in defense of threatened ravens in southern Idaho. 

Click here to learn more about the campaign to protect ravens in Idaho. To see or sign Michele’s petition, go here.

  The conservative leadership in Canada is pushing for greater extraction of that country’s oil and natural gas resources, and has taken steps to curtail the rights of native tribes in the process. As you might expect, those actions are getting some push-back from the indigenous people. Today we hear from a leader of one of those groups, the woman-led grassroots movement called Idle No More.

  Since 2001, the Graton Day Labor Center has been working to improve the lives of immigrant workers and their families in western Sonoma County. Tonight they celebrate their 13th anniversary, and what they’ve accomplished through those years.

The Graton Day Labor Center's anniversary celebration begins at 7 tonight at the Sebastopol Cultural Community Center on Morris Street. See below for details.

John F Martin Photography

A series of 24-hour fasts across the country is meant to point out that Latino families bear the harshest consequences of America’s dysfunctional immigration policy. More than three dozen Sonoma County women took part in one that ended Monday morning. KRCB’s Bruce Robinson was there when a shared breakfast was served.

bamn.com

There’s no school today, due to the President’s Day holiday, so a group of students have planned and organized another public demonstration in Santa Rosa. They’re calling themselves Andy’s Youth, and the event is centered on renewed calls for transparency in the investigations into the shooting death of Andy Lopez. Here’s more about it on today’s Exchange segment.

 Today’s march and demonstration is slated to get started at 1:30 pm in Old Courthouse Square in downtown Santa Rosa.

  Even before it was a national holiday, Martin Luther King’s Birthday was an occasion for celebration in Santa Rosa. That tradition will continue on both Sunday and Monday coming up, and we get a preview of some of those activities on today’s Exchange.

After years of discussion and a late procedural diversion, Sonoma County is finally poised to impose limitations on the use of free plastic bags by grocers and other retailers. But getting to this point wasn’t easy.

Find details about the new bag restrictions here. You can also review KRCB's coverage of the Febrary 2011 Public Forum on Single-Use Bags here.

Last month’s presidential election in Honduras was tainted by bribery, fraud, and intimidation, says a local observer who was there. Her assessment is very different than the US Ambassador’s. 

 Another problem with the Honduran election that observers reported was widespread, especially in poorer, rural areas, was overt governmental vote-buying. Maria Robinson, who was there representing the Marin Interfaith Task Force on the Americas, explains how it worked.

  Black Friday isn’t about shopping for everyone. Mhana  Mason, an activist with Occupy Petaluma, is organizing a public demonstration outside the Wal-Mart store in Rohnert Park to protest the company’s personnel policies. She talked about it beforehand with KRCB’s Bruce Robinson.

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