California history

Mendocino Temple Holds Secret of Immigrants Past

Oct 17, 2017
Kwan Tai Temple altar
Sarah Reith

In the latter half of the 19th century, the village of Mendocino was home to one of the few large Chinese communities on the Pacific north coast. Mendocino’s Chinatown burned in 1910. Since then, its history has been pieced together through interviews and scraps of documents. Historian Jeff Kan Lee and reporter Sarah Reith took a tour of the Chinese Taoist temple in Mendocino one recent Saturday afternoon.

 This story originally appeared on KZYX, Mendocino.

Anne T. Kent California Room, Marin County Free Library

A new exhibit from the Marin County Library pairs illustrations of San Rafael from over 130 years ago with photos of their modern-day counterparts. KRCB’s Tiffany Camhi reports the “Then and Now” photo exhibition reveals the city’s similarities and differences over several generations.

First-Person Accounts Illuminate Gold Rush History

Jun 8, 2017

The Gold Rush brought tens of thousands of dreamers, seekers, entrepreneurs and charlatans into California, each, it seems with a story to tell. A new non-fiction book samples dozens of these first-person accounts to create a multi-faceted portrait of a tumultuous time.

The Gold Rush was covered in great detail and enthusiasm by the newspapers of the day, and those accounts can still be found today. Bu for accuracy and detail, historian Gary Noy cautions that they should be read with a certain amount of skepticism.

How Sir Francis Drake Made History in California

May 24, 2017
Drakes Nagivation Guild

Sir Francis Drake, a critical figure in British naval history, left his mark on this region’s history as well. He visited the Pacific coast of North America during his circumnavigation of the globe in the late 1570s, several decades before the Mayflower sailed.

Winter Rains Boost Gold Fever

Mar 20, 2017
Santa Rosa Gold Diggers

An ounce of gold is worth a little more than $1300 these days, enough to keep even casual prospectors interested and active, especially here in northern California. Today we hear from a Santa Rosa group dedicated to keeping the search alive.

In the great gold rush of the mid-1800s, hydraulic hoses and extended wooden sluice boxes were used by some big operators, but simple metal pans were the most common tools. Today, says Randy Ricci of the Santa Rosa Gold Diggers, that’s just about all that is allowed.