conversation

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

This week’s episode of Mountain Stage is hosted by songwriter Todd Burge. You’ll hear new music with an old feel from Pokey LaFarge, blues and soul singer Ruthie Foster, Canadian singer-songwriters Rose Cousins and Fred Eaglesmith, and Ohio’s RJ Cowdery. 

They’re all in live performance, Saturday at 12:00 pm Noon on KRCB-FM Radio 91! 

Stories of dogs and cats and other animals that live in our homes. Exactly how much are they caught up in everyday family dynamics? We answer this question and others.

You can hear This American Life with host Ira Glass every Friday night at 7:00 pm, and repeating Saturday mornings at 9:00 am on KRCB-FM Radio 91!

We hit the open road to hear tales of adventure and woe from honky-tonkers and hobos, train-hoppers and busking bohemians. En route we talk with Washington folk singer Brandi Carlile, who dropped out of high school to cut it as a touring musician, and New Orleans' Meschiya Lake, about her journey from circus performer to jazz chanteuse. Driving on in search of mythic America, we hear the voices of its discontents: Woody Guthrie, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Wilco and Pops Staples.

We are live in New Orleans at Preservation Hall for the nouveau stylings and hybrid sounds that have been cooking up in the historic jazz hub since second-generation director and bass player Ben Jaffe took the helm. We hear funky new grooves from the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, whose band members range from 20-somethings to an octogenarian. And we witness the sonic chemistry when the band is paired with singer Tom Waits, bluegrasser Del McCoury and New Orleans hoodoo rocker Dr. John.

The one thing you know for sure when you're watching a romantic comedy is that it's going to turn out okay in the end. When you're living one? Not so much. This week for Valentine's Day, stories about surviving the mishaps of love.

Hear This American Life every Friday night at 7:00 pm; repeating Saturday mornings at 9:00 am on KRCB-FM Radio 91!

This week's brand new episode of Mountain Stage with Larry Groce features a mix of rocking and soul-stirring performances from St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Mac McAnally, The Wild Reeds, Chastity Brown & Sarah Siskind.

Hear Mountain Stage with host Larry Groce every Saturday at 12:00 pm noon on KRCB-FM Radio 91!

Bruce Cockburn comes to KRCB-FM Radio 91 today during the 1pm hour, joining program host Doug Jayne on Mid Day Music. What will they talk about? Find out this afternoon on KRCB Music Middays with Doug Jayne!  

The conversation will be heard on the air at 91.1 and 90.9; streaming online at krcb.org; through the app which you can get FOR FREE at the APP Store and Google play!

Be sure to tune in to eTown this week for part one of a special two-part broadcast featuring the legendary singer/songwriter and Grateful Dead founding member Bob Weir, plus Americana artist John Fullbright. While we’ve been lucky to have both artists with us in previous years, this marks the first time we’ve been able to host Weir at eTown Hall’s intimate 200-seat, solar-powered performance space. Join us in eTown these next two weeks for a pair of episodes filled with mind-expanding musical exploration, candid conversations, and plenty of familiar songs to fill the air.  

Historical fiction radiates into the present with two novels featured on A Novel Idea. Join Suzanne M. Lang in conversations with Susan Sherman on her novel about mystics and Marie Curie, If You Are There and David Boling, whose novel is The Lost History of Stars, set during brutal Boar Wars in South Africa and told through the experiences of a fourteen year-old girl.  
 

Hear A Novel Idea, Sunday September 3rd at 4:00 pm on KRCB-FM Radio 91!  

eTown hosts Nick and Helen Forster welcome Texas singer/songwriter Hayes Carll to eTown Hall’s solar-powered stage for lots of great music, collaborations with eTown’s house band, and conversation about the craft of songwriting, and influences that have inspired him along the way.  

A Safe Place for Talking about Death

Jul 24, 2014

  Sooner or later, everyone is going to die, yet few of us are comfortable talking about that. Death Cafes are a forum where those conversations can and do happen, and anyone who wants to join in is welcome.

Mortality is a serious subject, but Linda Sinaird says that doesn’t mean the Death Café conservations are always hushed and somber.

There is a reticence to talk about death and dying in most western cultures, which is counter-intuitive, suggests Cynthia Sumner, as it is something everyone must deal with at some point—usually first involving others.