creativity

Tiffany Camhi

The rise of the do-it-yourself movement, combined with the push in STEM, or science, technology, engineering and math education, has led to a boom in Makerspaces across the country. KRCB’s Tiffany Camhi reports, Sonoma State will be joining the maker community when it opens its own Makerspace on Friday.

Political issues and positions are of secondary interest to comedian Will Durst. He zeros in on their personalities and foibles to, in his words, “put the ‘mock’ in democracy.”

Will Durst’s shows are, for the most part, carefully scripted—albeit with frequent updates. But he relishes the moments of ad lib interaction with the audience.

Will Durst brings his “Elect to Laugh 2016” show to the Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma on Sunday night at 7:30.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Efficiency and curiosity are fundamentally at odds with each other, says a Sonoma State liberal studies professor. And that basic conflict needs to be acknowledged in shaping our educational systems.

Curiosity and imagination are separate but closely linked qualities, says Wendy Ostroff. She cites a recent experiment that underscored their importance in problem solving.

  Carl Hiaasen’s latest novel mocks reality TV, restaurant inspection standards, product liability lawyers, and beach restoration opportunists. But he insists that it’s all rooted in the skewed reality of contemporary south Florida.

Carl Hiaasen’s writings also include several books for younger readers, the most recent one being, Skink. He recalls being surprised when it was suggested that he pitch something to that audience, but with a little key guidance, he found a second niche.

Tiffany Camhi

Have you ever gone into an art gallery and seen a particular work of art and thought...huh? For one Marin County couple that’s the exact effect they want to get at their art gallery at their art gallery. KRCB’s Tiffany Camhi has more.

Find the entire McBag collection online here. And check back often as the gallery adds more "bad art" to the collection regularly.

Katie McMurran

Bolinas-based composer Suzanne Ciani has achieved success and earned five Grammy nominations for her New Age piano music – but her body of work goes far beyond that one category. Ciani was an early pioneer of the Buchla – an unusual electronic instrument developed here in the Bay Area in the 1960’s. Now thanks to renewed interest… and a recent music reissue… Ciani finds herself returning to her analog electronic sounds. Katie McMurran has her story.

Ciani made the recording below  in Paris in 1971.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  From the neck up, she is 26 feet tall, with a head-full of fire-breathing snakes. It’s the Burning Man version of Medusa, the attention-commanding creation of Petaluma artist Kevin Clark.

Behind the mask and beneath the flaming snakeheads, medusa also offers a communal space, explains the man who (with considerable help) made her.

  Once playwright David Beckman decided that his new play about Shakespeare would find the Bard suffering from writer’s block, it was up to the Santa Rosa writer to find his own words to tell that story.

With his story line roughed out, Santa Rosa playwright David Beckman then had to construct the dialog that would tell that story. And he  often found that the characters he was working with had already said something appropriate for his new scenes.

NPR

From established stars to promising newcomers, there always seems to be one key song from their early years that was a turning point in their musical life. But the connection between that song and their later creative output is not always clear, as Bob Boilen has discovered, and documented.

  For life-long music lover Bob Boilen, talking with artists he admired about the songs that were a key, early influence for them was a pathway to a deeper understanding of their music.

One unexpected but insightful example came from a  well-known jam band guitarist.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  Sonoma State is primarily a teaching campus, but many students also engage in research projects, including some innovative inventions, that were on display yesterday in the University's newly combined “Symposium of Research and Creativity."

 The possible applications of a mobile solar-powered generator are almost limitless, says co-developer Jarrett Baglietto, especially since their designed their unit with enough storage to drive even some big, power-hungry equipment.

Kristin Munselle

Madeleine Munselle is a 9 year-old 3rd grader from the Alexander Valley. She is also the author of a lively short story that is being adapted for the stage by a touring theater company that is heading this way.

Madeleine is already at work on her next story, “A Clue to the Truth.” The Story Pirates will perform at the LBC on Sunday, April 10th at 3 pm. 

Inspiration is where you find it. For Robin Eschner, most recently, it was in the deep snow and cross-cultural history of far northern Minnesota.

  Eschner's extended song cycle isn't just written for a multitude of singers; the music also represents a host of voices from pre-history to the present.

  Down through human history and around the globe, there have been occasional times and places where creativity and innovation flourished.  In The Geography of Genius, reporter Eric Weiner explores the conditions they share.

  Former NPR journalist Eric Weiner says he elected to apply a geographic approach to his survey of creative clusters, because he hoped it would offer insights that more conventional analyses have missed.

Audrey Auld

Every inmate inside San Quentin prison has at least one story to tell. Some of them were melded into music by the late Audrey Auld. The North Bay singer-songwriter talks about that process on today’s archival North Bay Report from last June.

Mixed in with the regrets, longing, anger and remorse shared by the inmates in her writing sessions, Auld also found the ingredients for a love song of sorts—one that she says is the essence of mixed emotions.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  Creative and entrepreneurial students at Sonoma State now have a new outlet for the goods they make, a student-run store that is now open on their campus. 

  A darkly humorous author avatar and a lightly fictionalized Sonoma County city feature prominently in a new novel by a local writer who knows them both well. 

Some modern classical music will be heard for the first time at the Green Music Center this weekend, as the Santa Rosa Symphony’s program includes a world premiere.

Composer Mohammed Fairouz is expected to be in attendance when his new piece is performed at the Green Music Center Saturday. Concert information can be found here. See the full BBC profile interview below.

  It’s Innovation Week in the North Bay, when businesses and other groups show off their best new ideas. The big finish is a competition on Friday, in which some promising inventors and entrepreneurs pitch their ideas to win both public support, and backing from angel investor groups.

Find details about the Innovation Competition, including the full list of entrants, here.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The Hall of Flowers is always a powerful attraction at the Sonoma County Fair. This year, they’re going all… er, far out with brilliant and elaborate illustration of their 1960s theme—Flower Power.

In addition to the expansive murals that frame either end of the Hall of Flowers, which are redrawn every year, designer Greg Duncan says he also tries to create a new layout of the exhibits on the floor each time.

  

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  First there was MAKE magazine. Then there were the Maker Faires. And there’s still more making on the way.

Described as "The Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth," the 9th annual Bay Area Maker Faire will be held at the San Mateo Events Center May 17 & 18, 2014. Get more information here, or click here for tickets.

  A local writer’s autobiographical one-man theatrical piece has enjoyed a warm reception at a series of performances around Sonoma County. Now he’s preparing to take the show on the road… rather a long road.

To get to Edinburg, David Templeton has launched this online  crowd-sourced fundraising effort.

  A first-time event debuts on the Sonoma State campus today. It’s  a showcase for student-developed products, services and businesses, called Market Day. KRCB’s Bruce Robinson talks with the man behind the event.

Market Day is being held in the Student Recreation Center on the Sonoma State campus, 10 am to 2 pm today.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  Applying delicacy and detail to 50,000 pounds of sheet steel, Petaluma artist David Best has created a new, metal Temple of Remembrance that is being permanently installed in a Sonoma County sculpture garden.

Petaluma Arts Center

As more and more people with disabilities of all sorts are creating all sorts of art, it’s becoming more visible—and harder to classify.

The current shows featuring works by artists with disabilities include:

 Undercover Genius:  The Creative Lives of Artists with Disabilities

July 12 – Sept. 15 

Petaluma Arts Center,

230 Lakeville Street,

Petaluma, CA  94952

(707) 762-5600

In a departure from her usual fiction, Santa Rosa writer Joan Frank confronts the process and experience of being a writer, in a collection of essays that is both instructive and confessional.

 

Frank likens the writer’s experience to a form of lucid dreaming, from which characters and scenes can be captured and repurposed. But she admits, a bit reluctantly, that it’s not something the writer can always predict or control.

 

There is serious intent and a compositional pedigree behind the musical political satire of Roy Zimmerman. Bruce Robinson helps peel back the process behind his topical comedy.

Roy Zimmerman performs Friday night, July 19 at 8 pm at the Glaser Center in Santa Rosa.  The videos below offer a preview.

A key question for any cookbook is, do the recipes actually work? In today’s Report, we meet someone whose job it is to answer that question.

Not all that much that changes from year to year—or decade to decade—in cooking implements and technology, but Maxine Bloom says there is one tool that has greatly enhanced her recipe testing work.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  First there was MAKE magazine. Then there were the Maker Faires. And there’s still more making on the way. Bruce Robinson has a sampling. 

  Described as "The Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth," the 8th annual Bay Area Maker Faire will be held at the San Mateo Events Center May 18 & 19, 2013. Get more information here, or click here for tickets.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Dale Dougherty had a hunch he was onto something when he launched MAKE Magazine, but he had no idea what a responsive chord he’d be striking.

MAKE is now published in five foreign-language editions, all in Asia, with an English-for-Europe version in the pipeline. Maker Media also produces a digital edition, and has posted many how-to videos online. And CEO Dale Dougherty says they are also branching out into another once-popular area of merchandising.