ecosystem

“How do you move from a place of simply trying to stop bad things and asking instead how would you make products and services in a sustainable manner?” asks managing partner of Ecosystem Investment Partners, Adam Davis. Now that the trouble with pollution has been internalized, we need the economy to follow. Is is possible to protect profits and the planet? Despite claims that a win for the environment is a loss for the economy, corporations are finding innovative ways to have it both ways.

In this week’s encore broadcast, eclectic Americana multi-instrumentalists Lindsay Lou & The Flatbellys make their first visit to eTown’s solar-powered stage to share their forward-looking take on American roots music. Also joining us for the first time is Swedish/Icelandic female folk duo My Bubba who share their sparse and beautiful music, as well as stories about their experiences in circus school and side jobs as locomotive engineers.

Living With Rattlesnakes in Sonoma County

Jun 19, 2017
Larry Stratton

Rattlesnakes are part of our landscape, and while they are indeed poisonous, they need not be feared and killed, but can be relocated to less populous areas. We hear more about them today from a man who does just that, and is known as  Sonoma County's  “snake whisperer.”

Rattlesnakes and gopher snakes are often confused, but Al Wolfe, Founder and Director of Sonoma County Reptile Rescue, explains that the poisonous rattler can be readily distinguished if you know what to look for.

Abetting a Comeback for SF Bay’s Native Oysters

Feb 1, 2017

Once prolific in San Francisco Bay, but now scarce, Olympia oysters are getting some human help in building new reefs—and helping their benefactors, too.

Linda Hutner, Executive Director of The Wild Oyster Project in San Francisco, says this area is following in the footsteps of other like-minded efforts elsewhere.

A Struggle for Survival on the Ocean Floor

Nov 7, 2016

The die-off of starfish along the Pacific coast has disrupted the underwater ecosystem, with a radical impact on other sea life on the region’s ocean floor. 

  Kelp has an unusual two-stage life cycle, explains Fish and Wildlife environmental biologist Cynthia Catton, and the large plants we see are actually just a small part of that.