event

The man behind the arch-gothic Lemony Snicket books for young readers says the Peanuts comic strip was an important influence on his writing.

The deeper he delves into the world of Peanuts, says author Daniel Handler, the darker it seems to him.

 Handler’s most recent novel, We Are Pirates, also features a teenaged girl as its central character. But he says the story itself was inspired by his life in San Francisco.

A fired up crowd eager to defend the Affordable Care Act filled the Marin Civic Center, to hear a panel led by Congressman Jared Huffman detail the problems they foresee in the new, Republican-sponsored alternative.

While much of the testimony focused on the anticipated harms that would befall the North Bay should the Affordable Care Act be replaced with “TrumpCare,” Marin County Director of Health and Human Services Grant Colfax also noted that the Republican alternative would also slash funding for health care at the national level.

Living With Autism

Feb 23, 2017

While Temple Grandin has become a well-known exemplar of a person with autism, attaining that status required overcoming a daunting series of challenges. It was a journey begun and largely shared with her mother, Eustacia Cutler, who has become an ardent advocate for families that include children on the autism spectrum. She has her own story to tell.

Raymond Baltar, Sonoma Biochar Initiative

In centuries past, bio-char helped grow food for the indigenous people of the Amazon basin for hundreds, maybe even thousands of years before the first Spaniards arrived. Now it could help the 21st century world to slow global climate change.

The Sonoma Biochar Initiative is hosting a workshop on the process this Friday at Circle Bar Ranch south of Sonoma. Find details here.

An informational meeting about the expanding business of agri-tourism drew an intensely interested cross section of farmers, promoters and others to the Petaluma Community Center yesterday. 

Tim Zahner, Chief Marketing Officer for the Sonoma County Tourism office, says that the agricultural and culinary diversity of Sonoma County is one of the area’s greatest attractions.

Nancy Fiddler sees expanding operations to bring more visitors to her Rollin’ F Ranch near Sebastopol as a critical step to maintain her business viability.

The records made by the Beatles have sold millions of copies, and their songs have been heard exponentially more often. Yet there are details and surprises within that familiar music that can be revealed through careful deconstruction.

Producer George Martin not only supported the Beatles' studio experimentation, says Scott Freiman, he sometimes had a hand in the innovations himself.

A call to radically rethink how homeless services are structured and provided locally found a generally receptive audience in Santa Rosa this week.  Now the challenge is to implement those ideas.

The Homeless Solutions Summit was well attended by a full spectrum of people concerned about homelessness in Sonoma County. Jennielynn Holmes of Catholic Charities says she thinks the event will mobilize changes.

To cure homelessness, give priority to the most challenging individuals. That radical rethinking of the issue served as the starting point for the two-day Summit on Homeless Solutions that began Monday  in Santa Rosa.

 Using a triage process--similar to that employed in a hospital's emergency room-- to determine who among the homeless is in the greatest need may seem like a resource-intensive approach.  And in some ways it is. But in the big picture, says Iain De Jong, it is also surprisingly cost-effective.

The fatal shooting of 13 year old Andy Lopez was shocking and polarizing. But documentary filmmaker Ron Rogers is more interested in what has happened in the neighborhood afterward.

When an editor comes on board to help complete the “Andy” film project, producer Ron Rogers says he or she will have plenty to work with.

Dragonflies aren’t just old—they date back to the age of the dinosaurs—they’re strange.  Also colorful, pest-eating, non-threatening to humans, and still surprisingly unstudied.

Among all the strange and unusual things that have been learned about Dragonflies, there is one that stands out above everything else, says Kathy Biggs:  their mating practices.

All around us, there are edible plants, growing wild. The trick is knowing which ones they are, where to find them, and how best to make use of them.  On today’s North Bay Report, we hear from someone who not only knows all that, she wrote the book on it.

  For Margit Roos-Collins, foraging has been a part of her lifestyle since childhood, a sort of family tradition.

OutToProtect.org

  Police and Sherriff’s departments in California and beyond have long included gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and transgender officers. But now those individuals are increasingly willing and able to let their presence be known, some with the help of a local writer and instructor.

  The Rolling Stones’ infamous 1969 free concert at the Altamont speedway has become mythologized as “the end of the 60s,” a symbolic counterweight to the romanticized images of peace, love and Woodstock. But a detailed new book from veteran San Francisco music writer Joel Selvin shows that the full story of the event is much more complicated.

Long before this week’s election results came in, organizers of the annual Latino Health Forum in Santa Rosa had selected as this year’s theme, the health impacts of racism and Discrimination. But current events added new notes of alarm and urgency to the event.

Beyond her insights and analysis into the neurobiological “scripts” that contribute to perpetuating racial inequities, Dr. Jann Murray-Garcia says it is important for health care professionals to exercise their influence and authority to “interrupt” these longstanding social patterns, in schools and beyond.

Who better to educate Americans than about Islam than a southern California girl who grew up to be a lawyer, scholar and writer on the subject?

John Perkins, the self-described “Economic Hitman,” says the problems he helped create-- before reforming--have gotten worse in recent years. But he’s got a recipe for turning things around.

John Perkins says he has been encouraged in his call for consumer activism to counter corporate overreach in private conversations with many top executives in the companies that are driving the debt economy.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

When local opposition scuttled plans for an atomic energy plant on Bodega head in the early 1960s, the seeds were sown for subsequent no-nukes protests throughout California and beyond. Members of the Abalone Alliance, an early protest group, reunited in the coastal town over the weekend, to review their shared past, and consider their part in shaping a nuclear-free energy future.

Social Advocates for Youth’s new Dream Center in northeast Santa Rosa opened its doors last spring, and saw its available beds for homeless youth filled immediately. Now they are staging an unusual pubic event to call attention to the needs they are working to serve.

Political issues and positions are of secondary interest to comedian Will Durst. He zeros in on their personalities and foibles to, in his words, “put the ‘mock’ in democracy.”

Will Durst’s shows are, for the most part, carefully scripted—albeit with frequent updates. But he relishes the moments of ad lib interaction with the audience.

Will Durst brings his “Elect to Laugh 2016” show to the Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma on Sunday night at 7:30.

For a dozen years, volunteers have been working diligently to restore the historic gardens on Alcatraz Island. Now the results of those efforts have been documented in a series of details, full-color drawings by dozens of botanical artists.

The idea for the florilegium arose in 2012, explains Sebastopol artist Nina Antze, when another artist took some visitors to see the historic island prison, which is now a national park site.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Eighty-five years in 400 pages—with plenty of pictures included. That’s what entrepreneur, philanthropist and music lover Don Green has packed into his newly published memoir. 

When Don Green elected to leave his position with the General post Office in London and venture into the business world, many of his then-associates were shocked, he recalls. But it was a pivotal and life-changing decision.

Eight years into the process of creating the proposed southeast Greenway in Santa Rosa, ideas for what it will actually look like are taking shape. An online survey, reviewing three possible alternatives, is underway.

Follow this link to take the Greenway planning survey. Sign up for the Oct. 26 walking tour of the property here.

Libertarianism is a political ideology that has undergone some internal, rather severe, revisions in recent years which have moved it well away from its philosophical origins. A locally produced analytical anthology examines what Libertarianism means today. 

Three of the authors will be on hand to talk about their contributions to Uncivil Liberties, at a special book event in Sonoma Friday evening. For details, click here.

  Whether the motivation is political or religious, or just protective parenting, efforts to see certain books suppressed seem as persistent as the seasons. So Banned Books week is here again to remind us of that. 

The American Library Association has released the video below which lists the top ten banned books of the past year. 

Kat Krause

  Audio ecologist Bernie Krause has been capturing the sounds of the natural world for decades. But the changes he hears in those recordings now carry a clear and worrisome message.

  The Animal Orchestra exhibit at the Parisian Fondation Cartier museum is an immersive experience that occupies the entire facility, marvels Bernie Krause, as he offers a partial description of it.

The entire enterprise has been an unexpected success, Krause says, both for him personally and for the museum.

Sonoma County Regional Parks

The second of a trio of three-day kayak trips down the full length of the Russian River wrapped up today, as the participating stakeholders made landfall at Steelhead Beach near Forestville. Riverkeeper Don McEnhill is helping guide the floating conference, and he paused earlier today to discuss the changing political climate that is reshaping the environmental issues in the River's middle reach. 

  Carl Hiaasen’s latest novel mocks reality TV, restaurant inspection standards, product liability lawyers, and beach restoration opportunists. But he insists that it’s all rooted in the skewed reality of contemporary south Florida.

Carl Hiaasen’s writings also include several books for younger readers, the most recent one being, Skink. He recalls being surprised when it was suggested that he pitch something to that audience, but with a little key guidance, he found a second niche.

  Herbalists have long recognized numerous and varied medicinal uses for many of the plants we think of as weeds. But that’s not all they are good for, argues Katrina Blair, Durango, Colorado ‘s defender of wild weeds.

  Blair's fascination with wild plants of all sorts began while she was still quite young, an epiphany she recalls quite clearly.

katrina Blair and her colleague,Tyler VanGemert, will present a workshop on "The Chi of Edible Weeds" at the Yoga Society of San Francisco on Friday afternoon at 3 pm. Details and reservations at (970) 247-1233.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The Heirloom Expo, a colorful celebration of old, rare, exotic and bountiful produce, returned to the fairgrounds in Santa Rosa yesterday, with scores of vendors and nearly as many speakers. We hear from one of them on today’s North Bay report.

  All of the abundance and diversity of fruit that can be grown around the Bay Area tends to belie the fact that very little of it is actually native to the region, explains John Valenzuela.

The National Heirloom Exo continues through Thursday.

Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The official opening of a small new park at the site of the future Roseland Village complex offers further tangible evidence of bigger and better things to come.

    Caryl Hart, director of Sonoma County Regional Parks says that providing a free, outdoor exercise facility was a priority as they planned the new parkette.

Pages