event

The 'Economic Hitman' Returns to Sonoma County

Nov 2, 2016

John Perkins, the self-described “Economic Hitman,” says the problems he helped create-- before reforming--have gotten worse in recent years. But he’s got a recipe for turning things around.

John Perkins says he has been encouraged in his call for consumer activism to counter corporate overreach in private conversations with many top executives in the companies that are driving the debt economy.

Anti-Nuke Activists Reunite, Reflect

Oct 31, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

When local opposition scuttled plans for an atomic energy plant on Bodega head in the early 1960s, the seeds were sown for subsequent no-nukes protests throughout California and beyond. Members of the Abalone Alliance, an early protest group, reunited in the coastal town over the weekend, to review their shared past, and consider their part in shaping a nuclear-free energy future.

SAY, Supporters Getting Ready for ‘One Cold Night’

Oct 29, 2016

Social Advocates for Youth’s new Dream Center in northeast Santa Rosa opened its doors last spring, and saw its available beds for homeless youth filled immediately. Now they are staging an unusual pubic event to call attention to the needs they are working to serve.

Will Durst Finds Serious Humor in Politics

Oct 27, 2016

Political issues and positions are of secondary interest to comedian Will Durst. He zeros in on their personalities and foibles to, in his words, “put the ‘mock’ in democracy.”

Will Durst’s shows are, for the most part, carefully scripted—albeit with frequent updates. But he relishes the moments of ad lib interaction with the audience.

Will Durst brings his “Elect to Laugh 2016” show to the Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma on Sunday night at 7:30.

For a dozen years, volunteers have been working diligently to restore the historic gardens on Alcatraz Island. Now the results of those efforts have been documented in a series of details, full-color drawings by dozens of botanical artists.

The idea for the florilegium arose in 2012, explains Sebastopol artist Nina Antze, when another artist took some visitors to see the historic island prison, which is now a national park site.

Reviewing A Multi-Faceted Life

Oct 19, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

Eighty-five years in 400 pages—with plenty of pictures included. That’s what entrepreneur, philanthropist and music lover Don Green has packed into his newly published memoir. 

When Don Green elected to leave his position with the General post Office in London and venture into the business world, many of his then-associates were shocked, he recalls. But it was a pivotal and life-changing decision.

Greenway Vision Coming Into Focus

Oct 17, 2016

Eight years into the process of creating the proposed southeast Greenway in Santa Rosa, ideas for what it will actually look like are taking shape. An online survey, reviewing three possible alternatives, is underway.

Follow this link to take the Greenway planning survey. Sign up for the Oct. 26 walking tour of the property here.

Deconstructing Libertarianism

Sep 28, 2016

Libertarianism is a political ideology that has undergone some internal, rather severe, revisions in recent years which have moved it well away from its philosophical origins. A locally produced analytical anthology examines what Libertarianism means today. 

Three of the authors will be on hand to talk about their contributions to Uncivil Liberties, at a special book event in Sonoma Friday evening. For details, click here.

Banned Books Week Observes its 34th Year

Sep 26, 2016

  Whether the motivation is political or religious, or just protective parenting, efforts to see certain books suppressed seem as persistent as the seasons. So Banned Books week is here again to remind us of that. 

The American Library Association has released the video below which lists the top ten banned books of the past year. 

Audible Evidence of Climate Change

Sep 14, 2016
Kat Krause

  Audio ecologist Bernie Krause has been capturing the sounds of the natural world for decades. But the changes he hears in those recordings now carry a clear and worrisome message.

  The Animal Orchestra exhibit at the Parisian Fondation Cartier museum is an immersive experience that occupies the entire facility, marvels Bernie Krause, as he offers a partial description of it.

The entire enterprise has been an unexpected success, Krause says, both for him personally and for the museum.

Sonoma County Regional Parks

The second of a trio of three-day kayak trips down the full length of the Russian River wrapped up today, as the participating stakeholders made landfall at Steelhead Beach near Forestville. Riverkeeper Don McEnhill is helping guide the floating conference, and he paused earlier today to discuss the changing political climate that is reshaping the environmental issues in the River's middle reach. 

Keeping Fiction Stranger Than Reality

Sep 8, 2016

  Carl Hiaasen’s latest novel mocks reality TV, restaurant inspection standards, product liability lawyers, and beach restoration opportunists. But he insists that it’s all rooted in the skewed reality of contemporary south Florida.

Carl Hiaasen’s writings also include several books for younger readers, the most recent one being, Skink. He recalls being surprised when it was suggested that he pitch something to that audience, but with a little key guidance, he found a second niche.

‘The Wild Wisdom of Weeds’

Sep 7, 2016

  Herbalists have long recognized numerous and varied medicinal uses for many of the plants we think of as weeds. But that’s not all they are good for, argues Katrina Blair, Durango, Colorado ‘s defender of wild weeds.

  Blair's fascination with wild plants of all sorts began while she was still quite young, an epiphany she recalls quite clearly.

katrina Blair and her colleague,Tyler VanGemert, will present a workshop on "The Chi of Edible Weeds" at the Yoga Society of San Francisco on Friday afternoon at 3 pm. Details and reservations at (970) 247-1233.

The Role of Exotic Fruits in Biodiversity

Sep 6, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The Heirloom Expo, a colorful celebration of old, rare, exotic and bountiful produce, returned to the fairgrounds in Santa Rosa yesterday, with scores of vendors and nearly as many speakers. We hear from one of them on today’s North Bay report.

  All of the abundance and diversity of fruit that can be grown around the Bay Area tends to belie the fact that very little of it is actually native to the region, explains John Valenzuela.

The National Heirloom Exo continues through Thursday.

A Small Park in Roseland Signals Bigger Things to Come

Aug 31, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The official opening of a small new park at the site of the future Roseland Village complex offers further tangible evidence of bigger and better things to come.

    Caryl Hart, director of Sonoma County Regional Parks says that providing a free, outdoor exercise facility was a priority as they planned the new parkette.

A Tamer Russian River Flows into Sonoma County

Aug 26, 2016

  Most of the public access to the Russian River lies along its lower section. But this week, a group of river stakeholders, are kayaking through that upper reach, an outing organized and led by LandPaths and the Russian Riverkeeper. It was instigated by Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore, to bring attention to the river as a whole, on a larger scale. For the participants, today has been a day off the water in Hopland, filled with “tributary” events about that portion of the watershed.

The Russian River is Different in Mendocino County

Aug 25, 2016
Russian Riverkeeper

  Most of the public access to the Russian River lies along its lower section. But this week, a group of river stakeholders, are kayaking through that upper reach, an outing instigated by Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore. Craig Anderson, Executive Director of LandPaths is a co-leader of the current four-day trip, and he gave us this summary of the high points from their second day on the water.

Surveying the Upper Reach of the Russian River

Aug 24, 2016
Russian Riverkeeper

  The Russian River is the primary water way in the North Bay, but for most of its length, it flows quietly out of sight. This week, a group of river stakeholders, organized by LandPaths and Supervisor James Gore, are beginning a firsthand exploration of the waterway by kayak. Russian Riverkeeper Don McEnhill is leading the group, and checked in with KRCB to tell us about what they saw today.

New SSU President Opens the 2016 Academic Year

Aug 22, 2016
Nicolas Grizzle, SSU

  Dr. Judy Sakaki, the newly installed 7th president of Sonoma State University, greeted the campus community yesterday at the annual convocation, which marks the beginning of the new academic year. 

Dr. Sakaki addressed the convocation for more than 30 minutes, during which she also introduced the new members of her administration. You can hear her speech in its entirety below.

How to Address the Impacts of Cannabis

Aug 18, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  With new legislation at last providing uniform statewide guidelines for medical marijuana in California, and the possibility of legalizing recreational use on the November ballot, cannabis is attaining new visibility in the business community. But that is accompanied by a great deal of uncertainty, which was a big part of the discussion at a Cannabis Impact conference in Rohnert Park this week.

Hall of Flowers Designer Honored

Jul 19, 2016
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  The Hall of Flowers is always a powerful attraction at the Sonoma County Fair, and this year’s exhibit has been dedicated to Greg Duncan, the man who has been creating the floral spectacles for the past two decades.  We profiled him on the North Bay Report two summers ago, and here, from our archives, is that story.

Fugett Takes the Helm at Conservation Action

Jun 15, 2016

The new head of Sonoma County’s leading environmental advocacy group says she’s spent her life so far preparing for that job.

In addressing many important issues, says Sonoma County Conservation Action's new Executive Director, Kerry Fugett, it's important to keep a focus on the underlying factors that are driving them.

  Accordingly, Fugett says, efforts to rein in urban sprawl need to redirect new housing into vacant or underutilized lands within existing city limits.

Aging Drivers Should Plan for Life Without Their Cars

Jun 9, 2016

  Right now, most of the Baby Boom generation is still out driving on the nation’s roads and highways. That can’t continue indefinitely, so then what?

Getting into accidents, even minor ones, or receiving multiple traffic citations are indicators that someone’s driving abilities are waning. But AAA spokewoman Cynthia Harris says there is another important indicator that is not so obvious.

  One tool to prolong the ability to drive safely, suggests Rabon Saip (read his blog here) is widely availabe in Sonoma County.

Native Americans Invented 'Environmental Management'

Jun 2, 2016

  Native Americans were skillful stewards of the natural bounty inherent in the North Bay. And they were surprisingly proactive in how they went about it.

Find details about the “Tending the Wild” conference at Pepperwood this weekend here.

Living Through the Peak of Industrial Civilization

May 27, 2016

  From genetic predisposition to flawed cultural assumptions, humankind’s history is getting in the way of preparing for a very different future. So says Nate Hagens, a writer, educator and energy analyst who will speak in Sebastopol Wednesday night.

A more rational and comprehensive way of thinking about and measuring all forms of energy consumption, Hagens suggests, would be to focus on calories, which offers a stark contrast between what is needed and what is actually used.

Making the Syrian Refugee Crisis Personal

May 20, 2016
John Namkung

Millions of Americans have seen and heard about the millions of refugee refugees who are flooding into Europe to escape the ongoing violence in Syria, Afghanistan and other Middle East war zones. Today we hear from one man who went to Greece to do what he could to help them.

John Namkung was far from  the only volunteer to arrive in Greece without a clear plan for how he wanted to help the refugees there. He discovered there were dozens of ad hoc groups who had organized themselves to address specific needs.

Environmental Stewardship in Ancient Sonoma County

May 9, 2016

  When the end of the ice age brought climate change to northern California, thousands of years ago, the indigenous tribes here adjusted through changes in their diet, lifestyle and social structure. 

  One of the most effective tools for that native peoples in Northern California used for managing the environment was fire, explains researcher Benjamin Benson.

"Your Song Changed My Life"

May 8, 2016
NPR

From established stars to promising newcomers, there always seems to be one key song from their early years that was a turning point in their musical life. But the connection between that song and their later creative output is not always clear, as Bob Boilen has discovered, and documented.

  For life-long music lover Bob Boilen, talking with artists he admired about the songs that were a key, early influence for them was a pathway to a deeper understanding of their music.

One unexpected but insightful example came from a  well-known jam band guitarist.

Rev. Billy Ramps Up His Environmental Evangelism

Apr 24, 2016

  The Rev. Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir have intensified their act from anti-consumerism street theater to impassioned activism in defense of the earth. Their faux evangelism carries a real and urgent message.

Capping a whirlwind week of Earth Day events around northern California, the Rev. Billy brings his message to Sebastopol on Monday, April 25 at Many Rivers Books and Tea. See event details https://www.facebook.com/events/1722868934623003/.

Bruce Robinson

  As the election season heats up, the Sebastopol Grange and the Farmer’s Guild took a different approach to hosting a candidate’s forum on April 12. With three candidates for the Fifth Supervisorial District on hand—Noreen Evans, Linda Hopkins and Tim Sergent—the evening was structured to be informal, and in a way, participatory, as you will hear in our recording of the event., which is hosted by KRCB News Director Bruce Robinson.

Pages