Mendocino County

Young Fire Victim Remembered as Passionate About Sports, Friendships

Nov 9, 2017
Shepherd family
Go Fund Me page

At 14, Kai Shepherd was the youngest person to die in the North Bay wildfires. He and his sister and parents fled their home in Redwood Valley as flames overtook the neighborhood. As part of our continuing partnership on fire coverage, listen to KQED’s April Dembosky, who went to Kai’s school to see how his friends remember him.

Find the original story from The California Report here.

Ashley Oldham
KZYX

They’ve been called the “wine country” fires – but cannabis farmers suffered losses in the recent firestorm as well.  Unlike vintners, whose grapes were nearly all picked, the cannabis harvest was just getting started when the fires struck. Reporter Sarah Reith visited growers in Mendocino County who are now reckoning with their losses.

See Sarah Reith's original report on KZYX

Mendocino Temple Holds Secret of Immigrants Past

Oct 17, 2017
Kwan Tai Temple altar
Sarah Reith

In the latter half of the 19th century, the village of Mendocino was home to one of the few large Chinese communities on the Pacific north coast. Mendocino’s Chinatown burned in 1910. Since then, its history has been pieced together through interviews and scraps of documents. Historian Jeff Kan Lee and reporter Sarah Reith took a tour of the Chinese Taoist temple in Mendocino one recent Saturday afternoon.

 This story originally appeared on KZYX, Mendocino.

Cannabis growing in field
Pavel Ševela / Wikimedia Commons

For wine consumers, appellations provide useful information about conditions where the grapes in a given bottle  were grown.  In Mendocino County  and elsewhere, cannabis growers  are now getting ready to apply the same philosophy to their products, as reporter Steve Mencher explains. 

Find out more about the Mendocino Appellations Project at their Facebook page. 

Bottlenose Dolphins Now Frequenting the North Coast

Jan 6, 2017
Jackie Sones

Bottlenose dolphins have become increasingly frequent visitors along the north coast, as their range and numbers appear to be expanding.

The first bottlenose dolphin was spotted in San Francisco Bay more than 15 years ago, but Bill Keener of Golden Gate Cetacean Research it took them some time to begin venturing farther northward.

Best Practices for Outdoor Cannabis Cultivation

Aug 17, 2016

  Legal or not, there are right ways and wrong ways to grow cannabis outdoors A new document from Mendocino County covers them in detail.  Reporter Valerie Kim has details.

Available in both English and Spanish versions, the Growers Guide can be downloaded here.

Growing Grain in Mendocino County

Jul 17, 2016
Mendocino Grain Project

  Agricultural diversification in Mendocino County doesn’t just mean adding new varietals, or even preparing for legal cannabis cultivation. For a small but growing number of farmers, it includes growing traditional and specialty grains. Reporter Valerie Kim visited the man at the center of this incipient trend, Doug Mosel of the Mendocino Grain Project.

For the first time in 20 years, a new Economic Development District has been formed in California. It’s a partnership between two North Coast counties that has quietly gathering momentum over the past couple of years.

You can find the Economic Development District's  survey here, in both English and Spanish.The deadline for completing it is April 21.

  Claude Lewenz believes he’s developed a better idea for a 21st century city, one that is now gaining attention in Mendocino County.  He calls it a “village town,” and explained it in this archival North Bay Report from October, 2010.

The Village Town concept is a fresh start, as Claude Lewenz envisions it, a community built completely new and separate from what has gone before

  Designing the individual villages will be left up to the people who will live in them, Lewenz explains. He offers an outline of how that might happen.

Sorting Out the Legend of Black Bart

Aug 1, 2014

The most colorful and infamous stage coach robber in California history, made his name—at least partially--in Sonoma County. But it was his poetry as much as his stylish crimes that made “Black Bart” a household name. And an unknown fate has helped keep his legend alive.