Music

Music Articles
10:03 am
Tue August 11, 2015

Music Journalist Chronicles The 'Wild Obsessive Hunt' For Rare 78 RPM Records

Amanda Petrusich is a contributing writer for Pitchfork. Her work has also appeared at NPR Music.
Bret Stetka

Originally published on Tue August 11, 2015 10:37 am

With almost all the music you'd ever want to listen to available online digitally, the obsessive hunt for scratchy, fragile 78 RPM records may seem anachronistic. But author Amanda Petrusich says that those early records, which hold between two and three minutes of music per side, showcase the sound and spontaneity of a time before second takes were common in record studios.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:03 am
Tue August 11, 2015

'Summertime' In Hanoi

Vân-Ánh Vanessa Võ gives a Gershwin classic an expressive, evocative twist with the đàn bâù, a traditional Vietnamese instrument.
Nguyen Nhat Hoang Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 11, 2015 6:23 am

Summer might be winding down, but you couldn't tell by the steamy temperatures, not only in much of the U.S. but also in Hanoi, where Vietnamese performer and composer Vân-Ánh Vanessa Võ grew up — and where it should top out around 92 degrees today.

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NPR Story
2:01 am
Tue August 11, 2015

Cumberland Caverns: A Subterranean Concert Venue In Tennessee

Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder perform during "Bluegrass Underground" at the Cumberland Caverns in 2010.
Beth Gwinn Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 18, 2015 2:24 pm

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Music for the Mind
11:08 am
Mon August 10, 2015

Newtopian Dream: Buy This Frackin' Album and More

Hi all,

On tonight's Newtopian Dream (7-10 pm on KRCB 91.1 and 90.9FM, streaming at krcb.org): Fannie Lou Hamer (Songs My Mother Taught Me), Amazing Grace, and Buy This Frackin' Album plus more . . .

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You Can Go Home Again
11:02 am
Mon August 10, 2015

Something Completely Different Hits Home, This Tuesday at 7 pm

Don't be embarrassed. Everyone gets sentimental about home, even when there's no such place anymore. For instance, my mother was from a town in Utah that ceased to exist. It was called Garfield, and it was a company town for the Bingham Copper Mine, and ultimately the mine grew so big that it swallowed up the town. My own home town experience was growing up in one called Cow Hollow, a part of San Francisco that fewer and fewer people, even long term residents, have ever heard of.

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The Record
9:03 pm
Sun August 9, 2015

Sean Price, Well-Loved Brooklyn Rapper, Dies At 43

Sean Price onstage in New York City in September of 2014.
Polina Yamshchikov for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 11, 2015 8:30 am

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Author Interviews
2:14 pm
Sun August 9, 2015

'Dark Days': Retracing The Steps Of A Heavy Metal Tragedy

D. Randall Blythe is the lead vocalist of the metal band Lamb of God.
Tim Zuchowski Courtesy of Da Capo Press

Originally published on Mon August 10, 2015 5:56 pm

Heavy metal is one music culture whose concerts can get pretty aggressive. Stage divers often try to climb up with the band then launch themselves into the awaiting arms of the audience — or that's the idea. In the city of Prague in 2010, one fan wasn't so lucky: At a particularly unruly show by the band Lamb of God, Daniel Nosek fell off the stage, hit his head and died weeks later.

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Music Interviews
2:31 am
Sun August 9, 2015

Florence Welch Comes Face-To-Face With Herself On 'How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful'

Florence and the Machine's latest album is called How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 9, 2015 6:54 am

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Music News
2:33 pm
Sat August 8, 2015

The Real Charlie McCoy, A Musical Quarterback Of 1960s Nashville

Charlie McCoy and the Escorts perform at the Jolly Roger in Printers Alley, circa 1965. From left to right: Wayne Butler, Jerry Tuttle, Kenny Buttrey, Mac Gayden, and Charlie McCoy.
Courtesy of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Originally published on Sat August 8, 2015 2:34 pm

Charlie McCoy has been a fixture in the Nashville studio scene for nearly half a century. He's best known as a country virtuoso on harmonica, but he's also done a whole lot else: rock 'n' roll, R&B, pop, even Celtic music. And he was part of a pivotal moment in the city's history, when the counter-cultural folk-rock of the late 1960s came to town.

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Music Interviews
4:47 am
Sat August 8, 2015

The 'Imaginary Man' Lives In Rayland Baxter Head

Originally published on Sat August 8, 2015 9:52 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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