native people

Controlled Burn Tests Eco-Benefits of Fire

May 30, 2017
Bruce Robinson / KRCB-FM

That plume of smoke rising from the Bouverie Preserve near Glen Ellen late Tuesday morning was a carefully watched experiment in applying a land management technique that goes back thousands of years.

The fire took about three hours to burn across the designated 17 acre area. That was ample time for any affected wildlife to leave the area or take cover underground, says ACR Fire Ecologist Sasha Berleman, while deer, when they return, will find a more hospitable landscape.

A Time Capsule from the 1960s

Jan 17, 2017

Surrounded by thousands of years of native history, the burned out ruins of a 196os commune in northern Marin County have yielded an unexpected glimpse into the details of “hippie” life  from that era.

While the extensive and varied collection of damaged vinyl records was perhaps the most interesting thing he found in the wreckage of the Burdell Mansion, State Parks archeologist Breck Parkman says there were some other things that were more surprising.

Ishi’s Story, Through Native Eyes

Nov 11, 2016

Ishi, the so-called “Last Yahi” may be the most famous Indian in California history.  But much of what has been taught about him over the past century has turned out to be wrong.

 

Native Americans Invented 'Environmental Management'

Jun 2, 2016

  Native Americans were skillful stewards of the natural bounty inherent in the North Bay. And they were surprisingly proactive in how they went about it.

Find details about the “Tending the Wild” conference at Pepperwood this weekend here.

Environmental Stewardship in Ancient Sonoma County

May 9, 2016

  When the end of the ice age brought climate change to northern California, thousands of years ago, the indigenous tribes here adjusted through changes in their diet, lifestyle and social structure. 

  One of the most effective tools for that native peoples in Northern California used for managing the environment was fire, explains researcher Benjamin Benson.

Dogsled Race Inspires Local Composer’s Song Cycle

Mar 16, 2016

Inspiration is where you find it. For Robin Eschner, most recently, it was in the deep snow and cross-cultural history of far northern Minnesota.

  Eschner's extended song cycle isn't just written for a multitude of singers; the music also represents a host of voices from pre-history to the present.

John Trudell, 1946-2015

Dec 10, 2015

John Trudell, who died Tuesday, was a poet, a soldier, a musician, and an outspoken activist for Native American issues. He spoke with KRCB during a North Bay visit several years ago, and today we revisit that archival North Bay Report.

Eloquent, impassioned and powerful, Trudell's words were his greatest strength, even in his music vidoes. See two examples below.

The Native People of the Sonoma Coast

Apr 22, 2015

  The Sonoma County coast has been populated for at least 8000 years, and life for the native people there didn’t change much over most of that time.

  Local archeologist  Tom Origer will lead a workshop on the Archeology and History of the Sonoma Coast on Saturday, April 25, 9-2  at the Bodega Bay Fire Station, sponsored by the Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods.

Indian Basket Weaving in the 21st Century

Oct 22, 2014

  

 Native Americans have been weaving baskets for generations, and while their methods have changed little over time, access to the indigenous materials they use has grown much more complicated.

   The "Tending the Wild" workshops are being held on Saturday, Oct. 25 and Sunday, Oct. 26 at the Pepperwood Preserve on Franz Valley Road northeast of Santa Rosa. Linda Navarro, Executive Director of the sponsoring California Indian Basketweavers Association, tells attendees what to expect:

Pomo Culture, History Honored in Sebastopol

Sep 25, 2014
Bruce Robinson, KRCB

  Long before Sebastopol was a town, it was home to indigenous Pomo tribes for many generations. That history is explored and recognized in a series of Pomo–related events during October, the town’s fifth annual Pomo Honoring Month.

There will be a reception at the Sebastopol Historical museum on Saturday, September 27 from 1-4 pm to kick off this year’s Pomo Horning Month events. You can find a complete list of those activities  here.

History Comes Alive at Fort Ross

Jul 25, 2014
Fort Ross Foundation

  It may the most unusual historical celebration in the North Bay each year—that’s the annual Cultural Heritage Day at Fort Ross on the northern Sonoma County coast. It comes around again tomorrow, so here’s a peek at what you’ll find there.

Robin Joy Wellman ha’s been working out at Fort Ross for 24 years now—so she’s got some history of her own at the park there. The event runs from 10-6 on Saturday and you'll find a compelte schedule of activities here.

Groups seek to return condors to the North Coast

Jun 18, 2014
All images courtesy C. West, Yurok Tribe.

For the Yurok Native Americans of the North Coast, few animals are as sacred as the California condor. Returning from the brink of extinction, California condors are expanding their range. The North Coast is poised to be next.  

"They haven’t really been seen in this area for 100 years," says Tiana Williams, a biologist and Yurok tribal member, "but they figure heavily in our stories and feature heavily in our world renewal ceremonies."

Indigenous People's Group Seeks Wider Support

Apr 9, 2014

  The conservative leadership in Canada is pushing for greater extraction of that country’s oil and natural gas resources, and has taken steps to curtail the rights of native tribes in the process. As you might expect, those actions are getting some push-back from the indigenous people. Today we hear from a leader of one of those groups, the woman-led grassroots movement called Idle No More.